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Fun with the M1917

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    Fun with the M1917

    ot out with my Eddystone M1917 today for a little fun on the range. Shot 70 rnds and remembered after the first 30 to take off the prescription glasses and just use safety glasses. Amazing how I can now see both the front sight and the target. Thanks to Art Neergard showing me this years ago. After trying all the different lenses and trick, the naked eye, in my case, works better for iron sight shooting. Need to make some sight adjustments but I had a great time all in all.

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    #2
    She kicks like a mule don’t she.

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      #3
      Indeed. Got to shoot my mild recoil M14s for awhile for my shoulder to recover.

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        #4
        Nice rifle and good shooting, I had a Winny M1917 Enfield when I was 13, bought it for $65 lol. I'm starting to sound like an old fart. Can't replace it now for less than $1,200+. When I was young I thought it would always be like cheap guns and everything would be available easily. Was dumb and sold all the stuff I got way back in the day.
        m14brian

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          #5
          A lot of us in the same boat. Hindsight is 20/20.

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            #6
            The M1917 was the primary US combat rifle in WWI. It's stronger and safer than the M1903 and can be just as accurate.
            The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
            The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

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            • RCS
              RCS commented
              Editing a comment
              That is all very true but the main rifle used during all the National Match shooting from post WW1 to the start of WW2 was the Springfield 1903 rifle. The Model 1917 had only limited use during the post WW1 NM matches. and were put in reserve storage.

            #7
            Quiz : What other US Military weapon also used the Enfield 1917 buttplate and rear sight leaf ?

            also name another US weapon that used the Enfield buttplate with slight modification

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              #8
              I am a user, not a collector so no idea. Interesting but never even considered the question.

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                #9
                It you think your Model 1917 has recoil, check out Maynard Buehler's sporterized M1917, it was converted to 505 Gibbs with a twenty inch barrel. Buehler advertised his scope mounts would always hold their zero despite very heavy recoil and built his M1917 in 505 Gibbs to prove it. (he was correct) besides scope mounts, Buehler also manufactured a safety for different bolt actions. Photo shows a 30-06 with a 505 Gibbs
                Attached Files

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                  #10
                  50 plus years ago I could handle pretty much any recoil and walk away with a smile on my face which has turned into a grimace these days.

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                    #11
                    +1, it was cool when I was younger. One reason I gave up .44 mag and went back to .45 ACP.
                    m14brian

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                      #12
                      Robert
                      The answer to your questions is the TSMG.

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                        #13
                        "That is all very true but the main rifle used during all the National Match shooting from post WW1 to the start of WW2 was the Springfield 1903 rifle. The Model 1917 had only limited use during the post WW1 NM matches. and were put in reserve storage."
                        The M1917 does not have windage adjustment in any reasonable manner. There was a brief attempt to work "kentucky windage" based on wind flags for competition, but that effort was dropped as unworkable. The M1903's windage adjustments with a simple knob is what kept it in use.
                        The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
                        The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

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                          #14
                          Your missing the real reason the Model 1917 was not used in the National Matches

                          Do you really think the military and civilians at Springfield Armory would permit the US Military and civilian shooters to use a rifle designed for another country (England) to be used in the National Matches in the USA ? The National Match 1903 rifles assembled at Springfield Armory during the 1920 to 1939 period were the most accurate rifles available.

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                            #15
                            Agree with RCS here. Seriously, we were not about to make standard issuance (let alone allow the 1917 to be a NM rifle) of a rifle that was a halfbreed from across the puddle. The M1917 was sort of a genetic conglomeration. It borrowed from the Mauser locking lug design as well as retaining some features unique to the Lee Enfield such as the cock on open operation (and new features designed by the British). To be honest, it wasn’t even entirely a British rifle. It served well, but mostly due to its design background, the M1917 was hastily dropped after WWI. We wanted an “American” rifle and the 1903 fit the bill. Of course, the 1903 wasn’t exactly conceived in the good old USA either, but that’s another story for another time. 😉

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