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  • cdhknives
    replied
    Originally posted by Orlando View Post
    Its the piston that drives the op rod not the solder. There shouldnt be any solder/brazing up the side of the piston
    Uh, yeah, got that, but my equipment and brazing skill level was barely up to the task of getting the piston attached (not enough heat, need a better torch plus need smaller rod), it got messy, and once nickel silver brazing rod sticks it is *stuck*. It had to be mechanically removed or I would need a new piston. All in all not a pretty job. Another 72 rounds downrange today and no problems, so it at least is functional. If I took off too much I would think it would be short stroking from excess gas leakage as my ammo is the Hodgdon starting load for 150 grain bullets and IMR4895.

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  • Orlando
    replied
    Its the piston that drives the op rod not the solder. There shouldnt be any solder/brazing up the side of the piston

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  • cdhknives
    replied
    Thanks, just seemed like a whole lot of soot for 16 rounds. I had to very delicately file off some excess silver braze form the sides of the piston and was worries I took too much off.

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  • Orlando
    replied
    normal, gas has to vent somewhere

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  • cdhknives
    replied
    How much black soot should belch out of the rear of the gas cylinder on the first few rounds? I ended up with the front bench bag way forward on my first shots after the repairs and the front of the bag was black! I am sure there was some grease on the sides and front of piston so some burning for the first few rounds was expected. I smelled it a bit too. No problems on the first 16 rounds but a thunderstorm rolled in before I could shoot any more.

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  • cdhknives
    replied
    Will do, thanks. I have a new spring and piston in route and nickel silver solder/brazing rod in hand. I can solder electronics all day but brazing is not my strong suit...worst case I have to buy one of yours.

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  • Orlando
    replied
    if you need a op rod pm me. i have a couple extra i would sell

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  • cdhknives
    replied
    I stripped it to the bare barreled receiver. No other parts in the gas system out of spec. While I was at it I recrowned it. Not *exactly* regulation but effective at getting light pitting at the muzzle out with minimal shortening of the barrel. A light skim cut on the internal 45 bevel, a light square facing, and a light counterbore just far enough to get to clean metal. Cold blue and call it done!

    Last edited by cdhknives; 07-12-2020, 08:31 PM. Reason: Added info...

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  • Orlando
    replied
    You are going about it all the wrong way
    Replace op rod piston with correct size piston or buy a new inspec op rod.

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  • cdhknives
    replied
    I had also pictured something like this, then found someone already making them. just cut the op rod behind the piston. I doubt the spring will care about the quarter to half inch...

    https://www.standardpartsllc.com/pro...&idcategory=15

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  • cdhknives
    replied
    It is a shooter. If I catch the bug badly I will look into buying a correct one, but for now I am partially unemployed due to the current business climate so I have time and machinery, not so much spare $$$. I guess if I bugger it on the lathe it needed to be replaced anyway. I hear the pistons are 17-4 and I have turned that before easily enough.

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  • jak
    replied
    If you don't care about getting a "correct" op rods for the rifle, then you can spend $100.00 to $120.00 for an good op rod from a reputable seller.
    Or you can send the op rod to Columbus Machine Works to have them replace the piston.

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  • cdhknives
    replied
    Any suggestions on replacement? A new op rod starts me down a very expensive road and a rebuild is not in the cards right now...would rather sell and buy another from CMP before pouring a lot of money into this one. I assume cylinder is probably worn too but need time to turn a couple of quick gages to check. I have a decent lathe. Looking at it, I might be able to bore out old piston with carbide tooling. I was not able to knock it out with a 1/4" steel rod and some creative force application. Yes I am being careful to keep the op rod from getting bent. If there is a trick to drilling them out I have a few years hobby level experience with a lathe...heck I have 17-4PH stock and could machine a replacement if I can get the old one out without damaging the rod.

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  • Orlando
    replied
    under .5250 is reject , yours will need repaired or op rod replaced

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  • cdhknives
    replied
    Op rod spring is due Tuesday. I stripped it down and mic'd the piston at .5215-.5220" which is below spec as I find it. I don't have gage plugs to check the cylinder. How serious is this? Can I compensate with my reloads, which right now are basically starting loads for 30-06 using IMR4895.

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