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M1 Garand recoil energy gage

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    M1 Garand recoil energy gage

    Gage for measuring receoil energy




    #2
    Interesting. I wonder when it was developed? I don't recall seeing this one listed in Pyle's book and it is not listed in the 1946 ORD-SIP-S200 for the M1 Rifle.

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      #3
      Not sure,not much info on archives other than what's listed on picture.

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        #4
        Collection Number: 10.01/11.01.05-09602#7223-SA.1
        Title: RECORDS OF THE SPRINGFIELD ARMORY : Records of the Research and Engineering Division
        Recoil Energy Fixture - M1 Rifle - To Obtain Operating Slide Recoil Energy
        Dates: 10 MAR 1950
        Category: PHOTOGRAPH
        Location: BOX 096, FOLDER 02, NEG 7223-SA
        Physical Description: Close-up view of bolt/slide/trigger area of M1 rifle. Many of the metal components are etched with ID numbers.
        Full Text: Armories\Military weapons\Principal components analysis

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          #5
          Suspended rifle recoil test, M1 vs Recoiless gun: https://www.reddit.com/r/physicsgifs...nfantry_rifle/

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            #6
            Hummmm I wonder how it worked? looks like the op-rod handle pushes the ratcheting thing back.

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              #7
              Originally posted by Phil McGrath View Post
              Hummmm I wonder how it worked? looks like the op-rod handle pushes the ratcheting thing back.
              And I was thinking it looks like that pin must get compressed and it might have calibration marks indicating lbs force?

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                #8
                Originally posted by Garanditis View Post

                And I was thinking it looks like that pin must get compressed and it might have calibration marks indicating lbs force?
                I was thinking the pin is adjusted too make contact on the op-rod after the bolt unlocks or the notches are used for placement anywhere along the railing. That's what I was thinking, maybe the notches are for indicating force or the pin is somehow graduated for after contact/travel. Cool tool for sure, someone should revisit this project for the handloader ?
                Last edited by Phil McGrath; 01-18-2018, 04:07 PM.

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                  #9
                  I've submitted a request for information to the Springfield Armory (museum) ... I'll share whatever response I get. I am curious.

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                    #10
                    very interesting, thanks for posting

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                      #11
                      Initial response from SA Armory Museum Curator Alex MacKenzie:

                      "Hello,


                      Thanks for writing. All we have right now is a couple photographs. It seems likely these photos were taken for a report or other document, but what (or where) that is at the moment is unknown. I'll certainly keep my eyes peeled for a reference to it.

                      I hope that the pictures are helpful,"

                      ... and attached were the two photographs from the OP above.

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                        #12
                        When I first viewed this I thought the sliding part of the gage may have been the pinion part of a moving rack and pinion set up .But upon closer look at the original photo the back side of the moving part also has a rack gear machined .So it appears that the moving part would be pre set at a desired location and secured ? I'm thinking now there may be something missing ,probably a gage that connected to the exposed plunger that measured lb force at different locations along the track cycle area .

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