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Snake versus cleaning rod/patches

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    Snake versus cleaning rod/patches

    I found using a snake to clean my M1 barrel to be a "gentler" approach. Just seemed that way. Only done it once. Any thoughts as to whether using a snake might be easier on the barrel than a rod/patch? I've heard that misuse of cleaning rods can damage barrels. But what are we talking about? When cleaning 50 times ( i pulled that number out of my hind quarters) a year? Very interested in any knowledge regarding this topic.

    #2
    Just my opinion, but I fail to see how a soft aluminum, brass, or fiberglass cleaning rod can damage a hard steel barrel. Even if the soldiers used the USGI issued cleaning rods, why are there so many rifles with original barrels available in such great shape ? If garand barrels were that fragile, none of them would have survived WWII.

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      #3
      The steel M10 cleaning rods are post WWII. In WWII a pull thru was issued. It was held in one end of the oiler. A chamber cleaning/take down tool was also issued along with a cup of white grease. The oiler fit in one of the butt stock holes and the chamber/take down tool and grease cup in the other hole. The same pull thru was issued with 1903 and 03A3 Springfields.

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        #4
        Originally posted by RDS View Post
        The steel M10 cleaning rods are post WWII. In WWII a pull thru was issued. It was held in one end of the oiler. A chamber cleaning/take down tool was also issued along with a cup of white grease. The oiler fit in one of the butt stock holes and the chamber/take down tool and grease cup in the other hole. The same pull thru was issued with 1903 and 03A3 Springfields.
        Yes, you are correct. My error. It's a bummer getting old and forgetful.

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          #5
          Believe me I know the feeling. Getting old has its pit falls.

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            #6
            Garand barrels arent delicate flowers as some seem to think. Need to read the article in the GCA where they purposly tried to wear the muzzle with a steel segmented cleaning rod. Long story short, you wont wear it out from cleaning in your and your kids lifetime
            Personally I dont care for bore snakes. Cleaning rod, brushes and a jag for me

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            • Garanditis
              Garanditis commented
              Editing a comment
              I've only been in the GCA for about a year now. Any chance this article is available online?

            #7
            I couldn't imagine what you would have to do with that cleaning rod to damage the barrel. The reason I bought the snake was to have a reliable backup. I had one cleaning rod and my son sheered the plastic loop in the end of the rod (deep in - wasn't easy to remove) while cleaning his 10/22. In a jam, the bore snake was available and I used it to finish up my rifle. The rod is definitely easier to use. Now I have 2. I'll try a jag in the future.
            Last edited by Garanditis; 09-12-2016, 07:32 PM.

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              #8
              Quite possibly the snake I bought didn't get a fair shake but I used it a couple times and then it sat in a box and I never really used it again but it's there.
              m14brian

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                #9
                I don't rely on my bore snakes too clean..... I us them as a quick and dirty sweeper that gets the chunks of carbon out nothing more..

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                  #10
                  1 comment

                  • #6.1

                    Garanditis commented
                    09-12-2016, 08:36 PM


                    I've only been in the GCA for about a year now. Any chance this article is available online?



                  Part 2 of the article on Muzzle Erosion is in the Spring 2009 issue of the GCA magazine.
                  I don't have part 1, but the Spring 2009 gives a brief overview of part 1 and the results of their test.
                  I would post copies here on the forum but the GCA gestapo would come after me for copyright infringement.
                  Last edited by jak; 09-16-2016, 02:30 PM.

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                    #11
                    The snake is good for a "quick and dirty" cleaning right after a range session but, as others have said, rod, patch, jag are the way to get a really clean bore. I believe the one area of concern, when cleaning with a rod, is protecting the barrel crown when, if damaged, can affect accuracy big time.

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                      #12
                      Have to agree with Mike on barrel crown damage. Had a Browning Safarie in 300 Win Mag that was a tack driver and it some how got a nick in the barrel crown and I thought I had pickup a shotgun instead of my favorite Elk rifle. Take care of the crown!

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                        #13
                        I start with the bore snake to get the big stuff but finish with the rod. Can't beat patches.

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                          #14
                          To pile on, I am with Phil. I use them for a quick wipe. However, that said, if you break a bore snake in your bore you will most likely never use one again.

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                            #15
                            I've never once cleaned any of my rifles...just kidding,I prefer the rod.

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