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    Gunk in Buttstock

    I recently purchased an original plastic oiler for in the buttstock compartment of my Garand. When I went to put it into the hole made for the oiler, I discovered that the circumference of the hole is covered with some sort of gunk. I don't know if it's old gunked up oil or what. The oiler will get stuck if I force it in with the gunk. What is the best way to remove this gunk while being easy on my beautiful original wood stock?

    #2
    That probably happened when the stock was dipped and left barrel end down, some owners never plan to use that feature. Of course remove the butt plate. And remove the action from the stock. Get you a piece of wood dowel,about 10 inches long and about 1/2 inch or smaller. use a small piece of scotch bright,wrap it around the wood dowel. Dip the scotch brite in Napfa, I would not pour any napfa in that hole, just wet the scotch brite this process will take time, because the scotchbrite gets loaded up with that gunk. Depending on how much is in that hole you may have to change the scotch brite and keep it clean. I would not use any kind of wood stripper, I always used sewing thread to secure the scotch brite, drilling a small hole thru the dowel to run your thread thru, this process I’ve used and it works, but it’s time condsuming! AJ

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      #3
      Originally posted by AJ Brink View Post
      That probably happened when the stock was dipped and left barrel end down, some owners never plan to use that feature. Of course remove the butt plate. And remove the action from the stock. Get you a piece of wood dowel,about 10 inches long and about 1/2 inch or smaller. use a small piece of scotch bright,wrap it around the wood dowel. Dip the scotch brite in Napfa, I would not pour any napfa in that hole, just wet the scotch brite this process will take time, because the scotchbrite gets loaded up with that gunk. Depending on how much is in that hole you may have to change the scotch brite and keep it clean. I would not use any kind of wood stripper, I always used sewing thread to secure the scotch brite, drilling a small hole thru the dowel to run your thread thru, this process I’ve used and it works, but it’s time condsuming! AJ
      The gunk isnt at the bottom of the hole, its sort of glazed around the circumference of the compartment. And its only in the hole thats meant for the oiler, which led me to believe that it was old gunked up rifle oil from the oiler. Like I could put the oiler the whole way in the hole i would try, but it would get stuck because of the gun around the inside of the hole. Its a bit hard to explain so I will post pictures later on when i get home.

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      • AJ Brink
        AJ Brink commented
        Editing a comment
        Okay I understand the scotch brite napfa will still fix that situation. I guess what you explained could happen, I don’t have a plastic Oiler, part of that units stores a bore brush and the patch piece, the other part with the O-ring holds the oil, most of the troops I know carry the oil out side in the hole. With spare patches usually wrapped around the Oiler. My Oiler is I think Stainless and only carries oil, it doesn’t have that extra storage area. Very early probably 1903, my ?Dads first rille was a 1903 and he also carried a Krag My Dad gave me this Oiler many years ago. On the invasion of Okinawa he carried the M-1 Garand. I think the rod kit was stored in the bottom hole, the bottom hole is a wee bit deeper than the top. I will check my M-1, I have my doubts if my stock is original, it may be no help to your question.

      #4
      If you use napfa or any other chemical solvents like brake/ carb cleaner or degreaser wear rubber gloves and do it in a well ventilated area.

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        #5
        Ya good point RDS, I figured, but maybe not, was talking to a Range shooter friend about the web site, trying to get him to join, he might. I was telling him about this post and the goo in the stock holes, he thought Mineral spirts would do a better job, on cleaning up that mess. He might be right about that! AJ

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          #6
          Originally posted by RDS View Post
          If you use napfa or any other chemical solvents like brake/ carb cleaner or degreaser wear rubber gloves and do it in a well ventilated area.
          Thanks a bunch!

          Comment


            #7
            Originally posted by AJ Brink View Post
            Ya good point RDS, I figured, but maybe not, was talking to a Range shooter friend about the web site, trying to get him to join, he might. I was telling him about this post and the goo in the stock holes, he thought Mineral spirts would do a better job, on cleaning up that mess. He might be right about that! AJ
            Thank you! I guess a have a couple methods of tackling this. Thanks again!

            Comment


              #8
              Hey WWIIman1942: did you ever get your butt plate on your new Garand cleaned, the storage holes? All that build up of oil residue? I’ve been working on my stock sense my last range visit, removed the butt plate, the service holes are really rough surfaced, ended up glueing 320 sanding paper to a wood dowel and slowly sanding the roughness, still working on it, after I get it smooth, I guess I will coat it with Tru Oil, I recalled your post and wondered how it turned out.

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