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    Buffalo Arms Barrel

    Unfortunately my copy of Canfield's tome is not with me for information, but here are some pictures of a 997K rifle with a BA marked barrel. I've found on the internet that they are replacement barrels, however, I noticed a few fall in this serial range which is probably not relevant just coincidental. I have heard some speculation (unsupported) that they may have been used on new rifles because of a steel shortage. I have also read some of Roberts comments on the web, as well as GSR #9 and GCA Duff 245K articles. The barrel has a bright bore with no chrome on the gas port. The barrel is marked D-3544-13-BA, R93, FJA, flaming Bomb, C, and the small character that sort of looks like a t. For another data point for those that collect the information the rifle was annealed. Has anyone done more research on BA barrels since the Duff and Pyle reports? Regards,
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    #2
    I use to collect data sheets on rifles with Buffalo Arms barrels but found interest is lacking among the collectors and only electric pencil rebuilds are important now.

    I did find a data sheet on SA 3,868670 with a D 35448-13-BA barrel with Anniston papers, receiver would be middle 1945, all parts were mixed SA.

    Also have a few of the wartime Buffalo Arms quarterly newsletters from 1943-44 it was called "The Accelerator" and nothing is said about M1 barrel production, I do know someone who has about all of these WW2 newsletters, but doubt any mention of the M1 barrel production will be found. I understand that production ended in 1944 on the BMG stuff

    You can find Buffalo Arms barrels on any WW2 receiver, none were chromed plated in production but could have been in additional rebuilds.

    Also of interest for some project is the study of the F circle marked M1 barrels from the 1956 period. Once saw a Ferro Machine & Foundry M1918A2 barrel 5-56 with circle F. Not as many circle F
    barrels as Buffalo Arms

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      #3
      I have personally handled 1919 parts that were marked with a circle F.

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        #4
        Robert, as always, thank you for the information. Well at least it is another data point. I'll send you the particulars tomorrow. I guess you have to roll with the times but I just don't get that excited about electric pencil rebuilds. I expect the shortage of good WWII era rifles has generated interest in the EP rebuilds. Regards,
        Last edited by CCyooper; 11-06-2016, 10:01 PM.

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          #5
          RCS, any idea how many BA barrels were procured and how common they are found still in service?

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            #6
            Don't have any production figures on the M1 rifle barrels, BA -13 most common. Back in the late 80's I found a 80xxx rebuild from a USMC vet, post war stock and BA -19 barrel all in excellent condition.

            Buffalo Arms made a lot of M1 carbine barrels and the carbine collectors always stated poor accuracy, not true with the M1 barrels.

            Buffalo Arms also made bolts, barrel collars and other parts for the M3 SMG during WW2 too

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              #7
              I should note that when these BA marked barrels started to be noticed in the mid 1980's, there was a lot of speculation among the Garand collectors as to the origin of the manufacturer. It was Dave McClain who stated that the flaming bomb stamp and the FJA inspector stamp indicated a contractor made barrel. Soon after it was discovered that Buffalo Arms in New York was the contractor.

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                #8
                Robert, thank you for the additional information.

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                  #9
                  I would think that the supply of Buffalo Arms replacement barrels was used up during the early post war period and gone by the Korean War

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                    #10
                    Here are some photos of the Buffalo Arms newsletter that was published almost every month, called "The Accelerator"

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                      #11
                      Thanks for posting ... interesting

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                        #12
                        As I told Robert this is an interesting rifle and it pleasantly surprised me when I disassembled it. It was labeled by the CMP as a Marlin barreled rifle, obviously they had not taken off the rear HG because as you can see from the pics it is clearly marked BA. The owner is rather pleased that it is highly probable that it is a WWII rebuild and not a post war Marlin rebuild. Based upon the info provided by Robert it could have been done in 1943-EOW or at least until they started chroming gas ports.

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                          #13
                          You never know what you will find when you start scrounging around.. lots of barrel talk, but nothing about a garand.
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                            #14
                            nothing about M1 barrels in these issues

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                              #15
                              Robert, what’s the earliest serial you’ve documented with one of these barrels?

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