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Trying to decide what to do with my war time Garand

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    Trying to decide what to do with my war time Garand

    I bought a Garand many years ago at a gun show in WI. It looked to be in very good shape it had a barrel dated 65 so I knew it didn't have the original barrel.
    I took it to the range awhile later and it wouldn't group, not at all. That is when I discovered that the bore was cloudy, or had cloudy patches in it, not shiny in alot of spots.
    I cleaned it and cleaned it and fired a few hundred rounds thru it to try and get that bore to shine, no dice. This is a barrel with very few rounds thru it, the ME is less than 1 but I think it's corroded and it's affecting accuracy.
    So, to the point of the my post. The receiver is in great shape and my instinct is to make it a correct rifle, I think the only parts I would need are a Barrel, Stock and Bolt, the bolt is from early 43, the receiver is March 45, all the other parts appear to be from early 45.
    I've included some pics. If this was reparked at some point would it be worth restoring to correct?
    Option number two would be to make it a shooter with a new, or low use barrel. Any input would help and thanks....Bill

    #2
    Many factors contribute too the overall accuracy of the M1, so before you condemn the barrel how is the condition of rest of the rifle and how well does it fit the stock. I would rather have a cloudy barrel that was accurate than a New barrel that's a bullet slinger. Pretty doesn't always shoot....

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      #3
      IMO it is not a good canidate for restoration
      If the barrel is just frosted that should not affect accuracy As stated there is more that can affect accuracy than barrrel wear. Stock fit is just as important as a good barrel. Good ammo is another

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        #4
        Orlando, why do you think restoration of this rifle not a good idea? You guys have me thinking about reassembling it with the new stock I have and try shooting it again, it's been years.
        Even if I can get it to shoot well, I would like to own a war time, correct garand. Preferably one that shoots straight.
        By the the way, it wasn't the shooter, I have professional marksmanship experience.
        Last edited by Madolive3; 01-05-2016, 09:15 PM. Reason: no professional experience spelling however.

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          #5
          I'm not going too put words in Orlando's mouth but finding a late WWII production barrel with low T/E - M/E is the deal breaker at a honest john price. Bolts and small parts are pretty easy too scratch and scrounge up.

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            #6
            Shouldn't the rear sight be a lockbar for March 45 also? May not be a good restoration candidate If it has been refinished.

            Value would be in the parts and not in a completed restoration. But if you want to correct it for your own enjoyment then feel free.

            The downside to correcting a rifle and trying to shoot for accuracy is that you need a nice correct wwii barrel with low wear. By shooting it you will begin wearing it out (depending on how much you use it if course).

            I find that I don't take my correct rifles out as much as a good mixed shooter with nice barrel. Putting a dent on or wearing the finish of a cmp stock does not sting as much as marring the finish of a correctly cartouched GI stock.

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              #7
              Regarding the grouping how Is the fit in the stock? Is it easy or hard to close the trigger group into the rifle? Any wiggle in the stock or is it nice and tight? Gas cylinder wiggle can also affect shots..

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                #8
                You will have more in it than what its worth.

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                  #9
                  Ok, I see. Cost vs value. Nothing I do for enjoyment works out on the balance book, that's a given.
                  Thank you for reading my post and taking the time to comment.
                  My next question, can anyone tell from my pictures if the receiver has been refinished?
                  I have a new stock for it and I wouldn't shoot the rifle very much, but it would be nice to own a completely functional symbol of American greatness that works as it did when it helped save the world. It would be more of a collector rifle that was shot once a year or so.

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                    #10
                    It looks to be reparked, is the chamber face shiney or parkerized?

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                      #11
                      Well the barrel is dated 65, so it was rebarreled. the chamber is not shiny. I reassembled the rifle with a new stock I had laying around. I'll get some ammo and put 100 rounds thru it and see what happens. I did the m1 test, removed the spring and trigger group, the action slides freely. I also measured every thing I could with a micro meter, it specs out ok, I could not spec the gas tube, i don't have those gauges.

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