Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Seeking help IDing April '44 SA Garand

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Seeking help IDing April '44 SA Garand

    Hi All,

    This is my first post on the forum. I just bought my first Garand on 12/29/15. Man am I excited about this! I love holding a piece of history etc ... - you all know what I'm saying. So, first
    off, I am trying to ID as much as I can after just field stripping it. I obtained an Excel worksheet off another website, whereby you plug in your serial number (mine is SA 2,727,xxx) and the
    "Correct Parts" and "Correct Type" ("correct" for your Garand build date) columns get filled in automatically. You then can plug in your part numbers/description and get an idea where you stand.

    My stock looks to be an SA (based on trfindley website stock ID page) and indicates a Red River Arsenal rebuild ("RRA" marking on buttstock, small crossed canons on base of pistol grip). The original cartouche (would've been SA/GAW) appears to have been sanded off. Or maybe this is a replacement stock, I just don't know. The barrel is an LMR dated Jan 53 heat lot A7 with 'P', 'M', and what looks to be crossed cannons.

    My question is with regards to the markings on the receiver above the drawing number. I have attached a photo showing what looks to be a 'Y O 4 A <Diamond> and 2 Ks?. I suspect these have something to do with the rebuild. Can anybody assist with these markings?

    Thank you all. I look forward to learning all about this weapon.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Receiver markings.JPG
Views:	117
Size:	86.3 KB
ID:	5784

    #2
    Your question about the markings above the drawing number on your receiver: those are not rebuild markings and were using during the manufacture of your receiver relating to the steel type and heat treatment. I have an original 2.77 mil Springfield rifle and my receiver is also a revision 32 marked above that is 0 65 B <> X.

    My barrel is stamped D35448-28-Y-67-A-M and dated 1SA 4 44

    Comment


      #3
      Thank you RCS for the informative response. I've been soaking up as much as a can as fast as I can - addictive. I wonder how long it will take my wife to declare I'm more in love with my Garand than her

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Garanditis View Post
        Thank you RCS for the informative response. I've been soaking up as much as a can as fast as I can - addictive. I wonder how long it will take my wife to declare I'm more in love with my Garand than her
        Not long....not long at all.

        Comment


          #5
          here are a few photos of my original April 1944 rifle, it has seen some service (photos of this rifle were posted before on this forum, so these are not new photos)

          Comment


          • Garanditis
            Garanditis commented
            Editing a comment
            7 months later I'm looking at these pics again. It's just awesome to see an all original. I have a question ... the brown/cola patina .. is that aged park or oxidation, something else?

          #6
          RCS.......I love that rifle!!!!

          Do you have any info on where it served or who had it?
          Welcome to the Addiction!

          Comment


            #7
            In 1993, a dealer went to a remote estate sale in a backwoods area of Wisconsin, the WW2 veteran had died and his 22 rimfire rifle and shotguns were for sale. Among these guns was the M1 rifle.
            Because of the worn condition (exc bore 4.0 on TE) and lack of finish, there wasn't any interest among the buyers. The dealer told his brother-in-law who called me, I told them to buy it for me.
            This rifle is complete as manufactured in April 1944. Despite what the "experts" post on jouster or the CMP forums about every WW2 M1 rifle having been rebuilt at least once - it is not true - as there are examples that were never rebuilt just as you will find examples of WW 2 M1 carbines and Model 1911A1 pistols in their original condition too

            Comment


              #8
              Originally posted by Garanditis View Post
              I wonder how long it will take my wife to declare I'm more in love with my Garand than her

              ​Gee,
              I heard that from my 2 ex's. I guess it must be true.

              Comment


                #9
                Mine is definitely not all original and has a mix and match of parts. The follower arm, follower, op-rod-catch, and bullet guide all have a similar if not exact same tint of parkerization. They look very clean, possibly a relatively recent re-furb. I'm going to post some pictures as soon as I get rid of the guys working on my boiler.

                Comment


                  #10
                  As bought ...

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1021.JPG
Views:	115
Size:	84.5 KB
ID:	5845 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1019.JPG
Views:	117
Size:	144.0 KB
ID:	5847 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1022.JPG
Views:	113
Size:	133.1 KB
ID:	5848 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1023.JPG
Views:	113
Size:	160.2 KB
ID:	5849
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                    #11
                    Looks like a nice rebuilt m1. Shoot her up and see how she groups. Love those rifles. You get a WWII serial number with the modern improvements. Enjoy.

                    Comment


                      #12
                      When I received my SA sn 2770090 I took it to the range to test at 100 yards from a rest. I used different clips of LC 54 both ball and AP and was able to fire this test target.

                      Not a bad target for an original WW2 rifle using mixed lots of ammo

                      Comment


                      #13
                      I'm torn. I want to go shoot ASAP. But the smarter sided of me says take it to a Garand expert for checkout before use. She is clean as a whistle, but I don't have gauges, calipers or the part specs
                      nor the eye to break it down and say it's good and safe to go. So I'll be dropping it off at a Long Island Garand expert and I'll have to wait. Argggh!

                      Comment


                        #14
                        My understanding is that the diamond <> stamp, meant that the receiver or bolt was made from 8620 steel. HTH

                        Comment


                          #15
                          Phil, 8620 steel agrees with what I've since found. Obviously ended up being a great choice, as well as the geometry of the receiver, since so many M1s still
                          have the original receiver.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X