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    Information beyond serial number

    Looking to find more information about my garand. I know is was made in Springfield, May of 1945 but thats it. Ideas of how to find out more info? Issued to where? to who? Any history of the firearm?

    Also, I cannot find any information about this stock symbol. (see pic)

    Thanks,

    Norm

    #2
    Hello,

    If I understand correctly, this "P" in square proof mark is attributed to a Red River or San Antonio Arsenal rebuild in the 1960's.

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      #3
      Thank you very much Jmd62.

      Comment


        #4
        You're very welcome!

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          #5
          Squares P is post war.

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            #6
            To whom and or where it went is information that only it, and God know, and neither one is going to tell you.
            Jon

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              #7
              What TJT says is very true. A WWII era M1 Garand could have been rebuilt several times after the war. FN in Belgium rebuilt M1 Garands right after the war for the US Army. US Ordnance had a major rebuild program in the US in the late 1940s and again in the early 1950s. Many of these rebuilt weapons were issued to US troops deployed to fight in the Korean war. Others were given and in some cases sold to our allies. There was another rebuild program in the early to mid 1960s. Some of those M1 Garands were issued to National Guard units who utilized them well into the 1970s. Many National Guard units were deployed in riot duty in the 1960s and early 70s due to civil and campus unrest during that time period. Before the CMP the DCM sold M1 Garands from US Army stores. Then the CMP did the same till the supply ran dry. Now the CMP brings back M1 Garands from overseas from friendly governments that no longer needs them. The CMP has received M1 Garands from Denmark, Turkey, Greece and Philippines. Korea sold a large lot of M1 Garands in the late 1980s early 90s to US importers. Other countries during that time period sold M1 Garands to US importers. In the 1970s, 80s and 90s the US government destroyed 1000s of M1 Garands by grinding them up. The wooden butt stocks were removed before the demilling. Those stocks were sold at auction. I know of one auction that 12,000 stocks were sold as one lot. Those stocks were sold by surplus dealers to civilians a replacement stocks.
              Last edited by RDS; 07-29-2021, 02:31 AM.

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                #8
                I am starting to think that maybe the serifed P in the box is late WW2, this thought is based on the large amount of Wisconsin barn wood stocks that surfaced in the late 1980's. None of these M1 rifle stocks had cartouches later than SA GAW (that I found unless Rick B. found something later?) also SA GAW was used as a rebuild stamp too (WRA stocks etc). it is believed that all this wood might have come directly from Rock Island. I have found serified P in a square box among this wood (not alot but still proof) which would disclaim the statements that all P in a box stamps are "post WW2" stamps

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by RCS View Post
                  I am starting to think that maybe the serifed P in the box is late WW2, this thought is based on the large amount of Wisconsin barn wood stocks that surfaced in the late 1980's. None of these M1 rifle stocks had cartouches later than SA GAW (that I found unless Rick B. found something later?) also SA GAW was used as a rebuild stamp too (WRA stocks etc). it is believed that all this wood might have come directly from Rock Island. I have found serified P in a square box among this wood (not alot but still proof) which would disclaim the statements that all P in a box stamps are "post WW2" stamps
                  Very interesting indeed on the serifed P in boxes. Would those late WW2 examples also apply to birch stocks, or only walnut?

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                  • RCS
                    RCS commented
                    Editing a comment
                    there is no birch M1 rifle stocks in WW2 only walnut

                    now M1 carbine stocks is a different story concerning type of wood

                  #10
                  Thank you Sir!

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                    #11
                    For a long time I thought my DCM rifle was possibly mostly early parts with the original barrel. The serial number is mid-July, 1943. A very careful look at the barrel with a bright flashlight gives a date of March, 1948. For a long time I'd though it was 1943. What this does mean is I'm more willing to use it, a post-war rebuild mixmaster.
                    The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
                    The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

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