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What to do with ammo?

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    What to do with ammo?

    Hi, all. I just joined because I am trying to clear out some of my deceased husband‘s ammo. I know I can get rid of the handgun and modern rifle ammo locally, but I have no idea what to do with can after can full of CMP ammo boxes for M1 Garands and the 30-06. Since the boxes have the disclosure that it is not new ammo, I am guessing it’s all reloaded. None of the gun shops around here will take reloaded ammo, so I am stuck with it. It’s not easy getting the little cans off the shelf, and there’s no way I can pull the big cans down, so I’m sure shipping would be astronomical from here in TX and not worth it. Any other ideas?
    Thanks!

    #2
    Did you spouse reload? If he did not then it could very well be factory ammo.

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      #3
      He did reload, but only 9mm and 45s, not these things.

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        #4
        The 30-06 ammo is Army surplus. It is not reloaded. The disclaimer on the box is just a warning that the ammo was not recently manufactured. If you look on the bottom of the cartridge you most likely see LC 69 on it. It was made in 1969 at the Lake City Plant. It should be fine to shoot.
        I don't know if a gun store would give you a good price because they would have to resell it and make a profit. You can rent a table at a gun show and you would probably sell it all within an hour. You can easily sell that box of 20 rounds of 30-06 for $25.00-$30.00. Go on some websites and check the going rates of 9mm and 45 caliber and see what it is worth before you sell.
        Looking for SA bayonets 922033 & 1045220

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          #5
          i may hire someone to set up a table at a gun show. I know Houston has a big one, and it would be nice to get rid of it in one day. Thanks for the tip!
          I’ve discovered that every ammo can is stamped what’s inside. I know my husband loved shooting his M1s and the 1903, but why on earth would he need thousands of rounds?! This is crazy.

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            #6
            Originally posted by Ruthie View Post
            I know my husband loved shooting his M1s and the 1903, but why on earth would he need thousands of rounds?! This is crazy.
            Even firearms need to eat sometimes...

            But seriously, a good day at the range can eat up a lot of ammo if you get on a roll. A buddy of mine and I would take several different guns to the range and go through a BUNCH of ammo in one sitting per firearm like we were a fat kid eating cake. Also, if you look at the recent ammo droughts, then buying a lot when the price was low is usually a good plan so you have some handy. Prices are just absolutely crazy right now. It doesn't go bad if stored properly too, so stocking up is always a good idea. That Lake City stuff is really great ammo. They made a quality product.
            You should get a good amount for it at a show. Like jak said, sniff around for some of the going rates on similar amounts and quality of ammo to give you a good idea what to ask.

            Hope it all works out for you, and sorry for your loss.

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              #7
              Exactly what they said above. Also, people who buy M1's and M1903's want to shoot them, and ammo is scarce to find for these rifles. I spent 50$ for a box of 20 because it couldn't find any around here. There's a market for it

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                #8
                Ruthie, you said your husband reloaded 9mm and 45 cal. Are you going to sell the reloaded ammo at the gun show ? Some people won't buy ammo that someone else reloaded. You may have to check that ammo before you sell it and determine which ammo is new and which is reloaded. You should specify that at your table too.
                Also, you should sell your ammo for less than the going rate. Let's say a box of 50 rounds of 9mm was selling for $45.00. You should price your ammo at least $5.00 lower than anybody else. Who cares if the other dealers get mad at you. Your goal to leave the show with an empty table and a lot of money in your pocket.
                Looking for SA bayonets 922033 & 1045220

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                  #9
                  How much do you have?

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                    #10
                    Let me know how much you have, maybe we can work something out.

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                      #11
                      The fact is, right now, the ammo you have is very valuable. Cans of surplus 30-06 are selling for as much as $300 for 240 rounds. 50 9mm for $45? LOL. I'll wager it's closer to $100 since it's unavailable anywhere. 9mm bullets, 45 bullets, primers, powder are all nonexistant in today's market. 1000 primers selling for as high as $150-200 at gun shows when they dold for $30 and less before. People will vigorously buy the reloaded ammo at premium prices just for the bullets and primed cases alone. To pull the bullets and possibly just throw the powder away.

                      People are desperate out there right now so don't cut yourself short by selling stuff cheap.

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                        #12
                        Ruthie I am sorry to hear of the loss of your husband. Your have my and our members deepest condolences. Was your late husband a member of this forum? I am sure there are members on this forum from Texas. Did your husband belong to a shooting club or range? If so you may want to contact them. I am sure the guys at the club would be interested. As others have said the ammo is worth at bare minimum a $1.00 per round. The empty ammo cans are worth about $15.00 each depending on size. If you can post a list and or photos of what reloading supplies you have we can help you with that also. Right now it is a seller market and looks to be for some time.

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                          #13
                          Saw this from the CMP Forum, I sent you a message maybe we can work out a deal

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                            #14
                            Thank you all for your kind words and advice. My husband and I recently moved 1000 miles from a community that had a free gun range, so there's no one he knew around here. He had his own shed for reloading. I know he was very particular and had at least two presses, cutters, a grinder, scales, bullets, casings, lead things... There are several boxes of that kind of stuff. I remember one day he decided to try loading some "hot" ammo, took it to the range, and said Never Again because it made him too nervous. Nothing exploded or anything, he just didn't trust it and got rid of it.
                            Ironically, helping the movers load the ammo is what he thought hurt his back, and when it didn't improve after two weeks in our new home, he went to the doctor. A CT scan revealed a huge tumor. Thankfully, we were within driving distance to M.D. Anderson, who diagnosed it as a rare, aggressive, incurable sarcoma. They thought they could manage it for 3-4 years, so he and I thought he had time to take care of all of this. Unfortunately, after his first chemo, he went into a free fall and lived only 5 more months. He developed calcemia, which produced a sort of intermittent dementia, and any lucid moments were NOT spent prepping me for selling ammo. His main concern was for my access to his version of Fort Knox with his computer, passwords, and the blasted safe. No mention of the ammo, and I didn't even know how much there was until my son-in-law set up heavy duty shelves and put it all up there.
                            My brothers out West have absolutely forbidden me to get a table at a gun show since I'd have to hire a stranger. Instead, I think I will catalog everything and move the information down to the ammo thread I just noticed. Hopefully someone in Houston or San Antonio will be interested, and we can work out a safe exchange. Having this stuff at my house is a little worrisome... Also, I have a pretty good idea what it sells for. I will ask for a decent price, but I don't plan on scalping people, either. I know my husband would have told me the same thing.

                            Sorry for the lengthy history, and thank you again for sharing your wealth of knowledge!

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