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Further questions on my Garand

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    Further questions on my Garand

    So I recently purchased my M1 Garand from the CMP, and figured out some really neat things. Today, I decided to continue my research because I read about some cut vs un cut op rods. I saw that the uncut is more matching with WW2 era M1 Garands, and my particular rifle has that. I took the rifle out of the safe, and took a snaps of the serials and numbers on the rifle, but I do not know quite exactly how to match all of these up. I know most M1 Garands do not match due to being repaired and fixed up, but I wonder if these parts are correct for the time. Could this be an original configuration? or has it been changed or altered after? Also, I only plan on shooting like 20- 30 rounds through the rifle, but some people say its dangerous with the uncut op rod. It cant be too unsafe if we used them like that throughout the war, right?( M2 ball only) Thanks in advance!
    Attached Files

    #2
    The barrel says 43 btw, it is a little fuzzy

    Comment


      #3
      Just remember that there is only one serial number on the rifle. The numbers you see on the other parts are drawing numbers. Generally you'd have to buy the needed books containing data sheets of original rifles in order to tell if your parts match the vintage of the receiver. Other books describe the years certain parts, with certain drawing numbers, were used.

      Comment


        #4
        My book says your receiver was born between July 42 to September 42. Your op rod should read D35382 3 SA. Unmodified. Barrel markings S-A-6-42 to S-A-8-42.

        Comment


        • TJT
          TJT commented
          Editing a comment
          Rifle was made in July '42. Barrel should be 5-42 to 7-42, technically speaking, of course.
          Jon

        #5
        So that would mean that it has been modified at some point or another, correct? Does that necessarily mean that it wasn't used in WW2 this exact configuration? I see some people say that it is not uncommon to see the parts not match because they were cleaned together often times. I'm still trying to learn more about the Garands. Most military weaponry outside of the USA is stamped with the same serial numbers everywhere. Thanks for helping me out lol

        Comment


          #6
          It definitely was not used in WWII in that configuration. While of the few pictures you posted, I can see a post WWII stamped bullet guide with the cut out. Your tigger group may show some later parts too as well as the gas cylinder. It has some great WWII parts though, especially the rear hand guard with grooved clip and oprod.

          Comment


            #7
            Originally posted by JosephAustinPresnal View Post
            So that would mean that it has been modified at some point or another, correct? Does that necessarily mean that it wasn't used in WW2 this exact configuration? I see some people say that it is not uncommon to see the parts not match because they were cleaned together often times. I'm still trying to learn more about the Garands. Most military weaponry outside of the USA is stamped with the same serial numbers everywhere. Thanks for helping me out lol
            Not "modified", rebuilt. Possibly multiple times since WWII. No doubt the rifle was issued and used in one or possibly 2 wars. When rebuilt they replaced out of spec worn parts from the pile of used or new parts. No consideration was given about original parts or even who made them. It's also possible it was field arsenal rebuilt. The 43 barrel on a 42 receiver may be evidence of that. Those rebuilds were often done with in spec parts scavenged from broken or damaged rifles to replace worn out parts on others.

            As far as any records.....none exist.

            What you have is what's commonly called a "mixmaster" Garand with some parts that may be original but probably many that are not, possibly parts dating into the 50's.

            And hell, don't waste it. Shoot the hell out of it. It's not "collector" grade it's shooter grade. You'll never wear it out in your lifetime with normal recreational, and enjoyable, shooting. BTW, don't worry about the uncut op rod. It's not in the least unsafe unless you decide to shoot inappropriate non Garand applicable commercial ammo in it.
            Last edited by lapriester; 02-26-2021, 07:53 PM.

            Comment


              #8
              While it is a little heavy the Garand is an excellent rifle for targets, plinking and hunting. I agree with Lapriester, use it and enjoy it. If ammo is a bit pricey, the .30-06 is an excellent cartridge to reload.
              The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
              The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

              Comment


                #9
                I agree with the upper post. I have a collection of the Garand and enjoy the heck out of shooting them. Beware: When you show up at the range, someone will try to talk you out of it. i had a range officer beg me to sell him my Garand in .308. Just stay strong.

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                  #10
                  The first time you hear the ping after the 8th round, you'll have that silly grin on your face stuck from ear to ear.
                  Jon

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                    #11
                    Oh yes. I shot it last Saturday and man I was smiling from ear to ear because it was super accurate and was honest easy going on the shoulder

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                      #12
                      Mine is 791,583, so not too many off of yours. Yeah, they tend to bring a smile to your face every time. There is just nothing else like it in the world.

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                        #13
                        In my previous location, I faced the risk of charging moose and less-than-friendly black bear. A Garand with good 180gr loads was adequate for all those problems while going about on my property.
                        The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
                        The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

                        Comment


                          #14
                          The follower rod originally in that rifle would've been a short fork, not long fork type.
                          Jon

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