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First trip to range with '43 Garand

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    First trip to range with '43 Garand

    What a great day! We had a 600 yard benchrest match in Delaware and I brought the Garand along to shoot afterward. Had picked up a spam can of 1970 Greek M2 Ball ammo from a friend last week and was really itching to shoot it.
    The distance that I fired the Garand from was 100 yards. I fired a total of 17 rounds. See the attached pics. The first round I fired as a single loaded round just to make sure it went bang safely. After looking at where the bullet impacted, I decided to load a clip and fire 8 more. I took a picture of the target after that and the bullet hole marked green was the first round fired.
    I decided to make a sight adjustment of 1 click left and fired 8 more at the same target. The holes marked with yellow are the first group of 8 and the holes marked with orange are the second clip of 8. Please disregard the 6mm holes in the target as they were fired in the match earlier that day at 600 yards.
    All in all, I am quite happy with how the Garand shot. It has been a lot of years since I shot at any distance over iron sights and I am a little rusty. However, it seems to me that the rifle did just fine!
    Jerry
    P.S. I experienced my fist 2 clip pings....Love it!!
    Attached Files

    #2
    Two thumbs up!

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      #3
      In addition to the Greek ball that I shot the other day, I just got over 400 pieces of Lake City Match once fired brass from the late 50's. I have Varget and H4895 powders and plenty of primers and a small base full-length sizing die coming. Just need projectiles in the 150 to 175 grain range and I can start loading for this piece of history.
      Will post targets with load development results when that happens.
      Jerry

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        #4
        Small base die is not necessary and will just over work the brass.
        Jon

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          #5
          Originally posted by TJT View Post
          Small base die is not necessary and will just over work the brass.
          Jon
          TJT is correct here. SB is not necessary but not at all harmfull. Yes, it will work the brass more a bit but, a Garand is so hard on brass anyway you probably won't notice it much in the number of cases you cull over time because of other damage. Specifically rim damage.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by lapriester View Post

            TJT is correct here. SB is not necessary but not at all harmfull. Yes, it will work the brass more a bit but, a Garand is so hard on brass anyway you probably won't notice it much in the number of cases you cull over time because of other damage. Specifically rim damage.
            Appreciate your input. I was thinking the same thing when I ordered it.
            Honestly, it appeared to be the only 30-06 full length sizing die available on the face of the planet at the time. So I pulled the trigger on it and it showed up yesterday. Able to move ahead as opposed to dead in the water!
            I am still looking for projectiles in the 150gr. to 175gr. range. I have plenty of 210gr. match bullets for my 1000 yard rifles, but won't consider running them in the Garand.
            Jerry

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              #7
              Seems the cheaper bulk surplus 147gr FMJBT are completely gone and sold out in advance these days. You could consider cast bullets in the heavier weights for the Garand. Some folks have good results with them. Loading 200gr plus jaccketed bullets can be done for the Garand, but have to be matched with a somewhat slower propellant to get the proper peak and port pressures. I've done that using Quickload which plots pressure all along the barrel. Most folks shouldn't even attempt it. You also have to consider the longer time a slower bullet allows for pressure to bleed into the gas system.
              The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
              The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Smokey View Post
                Seems the cheaper bulk surplus 147gr FMJBT are completely gone and sold out in advance these days. You could consider cast bullets in the heavier weights for the Garand. Some folks have good results with them. Loading 200gr plus jaccketed bullets can be done for the Garand, but have to be matched with a somewhat slower propellant to get the proper peak and port pressures. I've done that using Quickload which plots pressure all along the barrel. Most folks shouldn't even attempt it. You also have to consider the longer time a slower bullet allows for pressure to bleed into the gas system.
                Thanks Smokey...I hear you. At this point, I'm hoping to go with classic load combinations for the rifle and tune them for accuracy. And those 210 Bergers shoot too well out of my 300 WSM bench rifles to pop them out of the Garand!!
                Jerry

                Comment


                  #9
                  Interesting thread (another forum) on using cast bullets in the Garand. Apparently they can be made to work well enough:
                  My M1 Garand cast bullet experiment (gunloads.com)
                  The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
                  The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Smokey View Post
                    Interesting thread (another forum) on using cast bullets in the Garand. Apparently they can be made to work well enough:
                    My M1 Garand cast bullet experiment (gunloads.com)
                    I think if the speed isn't too brutal, the alloy is the right hardness, or they are all of the above with a gas check on them and/or properly lubed, they can work without making you too crazy. Think linotype hardness.
                    Then there are the swagers who can put a jacket on them. Probably the best overall option if you are willing to outlay the initial banjos to get started.

                    Either way, interesting.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      That rifle certainly shows potential. When you find the right combination of bullet and powder, that grouping should shrink considerably. The problem is, it's expensive and very time-consuming to find the rifle's pet load. Experiment with your reloading. Try different powders, and bullets from 110-180 grains. Bullet seating depth also will become a critical factor.
                      Stay away from surplus, or bulk bullets for best results. Conversely, Hornady A-tips at 80 cents apiece won't shoot THAT well out of the M1 to warrant the expense.
                      Have fun and keep us posted.
                      Jon
                      Last edited by TJT; 03-05-2021, 03:16 AM.

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