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    Philippine.

    CMP finally came thru, 769xxx I ran the receiver number, July 42, it’s kinda difficult to tell exactly what I have, Maybe it is and maybe it is and maybe it’s a total rebuild, Springfield. 3 numbers match trigger assembly, but the cocking trigger guard is stamped, should be milled? New stock, some of the numbers are very hard to read with my aging eyes, need a good magnifier with LEDs.my guess it’s a total rebuild saving what they could. From history McArthur resupplied the Philippine Army in maybe late 42/43/44 I have a photo of his return off the LST it’s a reprint I got it In Norfolk Virginia at his burial site. I know from photos of the military,the troops carried in the Philippines, anything they could get there hands on.
    Last edited by AJ Brink; 12-11-2020, 06:15 AM.

    #2
    In combat, rifles are used hard and frequently damaged. With few exceptions, WWII Garands went through an overhaul/rebuild at some point. Here's a decent article on the overhaul process:
    American Rifleman | M1 Garand Rebuilds: History & Markings
    More Garands were overhauled/rebuilt during and after the Korean war.
    The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
    The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

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      #3
      There is only one place the serial number of an M1 Garand is stamped and that is on the receiver heel. The numbers you see stamped on M1 parts are not serial numbers but drawing numbers. Drawing numbers are the reference number of the blueprint used to manufacture that particular part. Drawing numbers change each time the blueprint is changed and the part spec change.

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        #4
        Hi RDS/Smokey! Thank you for your reply, yes I did read a few articles, and if I Said serial numbers I am sorry. I have a book it’s old the cover is missing, and a few instructional explanations on the part drawing numbers, what I am finding out is this piece was never out of the United States. And maybe, hard to confirm it,Came from the Air-force, at least that’s what CMP claims, I didn’t realize they kept track. I am going to keep researching, to me this is fascinating, I started to disassemble it. I need to work on the stock a little, as I said before my eye sight is not doing well, so I ordered a set of those glasses that have LEDs with interchangeable lens, I hope that will clear up my Vision. Thanks guys! salute AJ.

        Oh I almost forgot McArthur returned October 20th 1944 and started his campaign to rearm and take back the Islands. Some Garands wound up their but several were 1903s the bulk of the Garands were not to arrive until the late fourtys and lend leased during the Korean conflict. Those 80,000 CMP recovered in 2018. Trying to find out if any of that is true!
        Last edited by AJ Brink; 12-11-2020, 11:27 AM.

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          #5
          AJ,
          Just for the record, my father was in the 503rd PIR in the Philippines. He got his M1 rifle in early '42 during jump training at Ft. Benning. He had that same M1 until he came home in Oct of '45. All of his buddies that I talked with at the reunions all had M1's. There was no shortage of M1's in the Philippines. As an aside, my dad was also a member of the test platoon for the T26 M1 rifles. You can read about them in Duff's WWII book and Canfield's latest tome.
          Jon

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            #6
            Hi Jon: that’s some great stuff, was your Dad on the death March? My Dad called McArthur (Doug out Dougie) I was referring to the Arms that were sent to the Philippines. And not issued stateside, I know their were plenty stateside companies that received them. Like my Rifle that went to the Army Air Corp. The Air Force was formed after the war in 1947 I think, my build date on my receiver was July 1942. It’s nothing but a bunch of made up parts two units are drawing numbers in the late 40s. So it went thru depot at least three times counting CMP. Apparently it was stored there a number of years, only found out it came in from the Air Force. Its not really very historic, but a nice piece of History and I am proud to own it. I bet your very proud of you Dads service, and I am Likewise. They were a greatest generation. Hope your enjoying the holidays, Salute AJ

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              #7
              No, he was not in the PTO when Corregidor fell. He was there in Feb '45 for its retaking.
              Jon

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                #8
                OH good, I knew a vet that was on the death march! They went thru hell. He passed away about 30 years ago. He had his ashes dropped on, Mindinnou.

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