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    Rack Grade Special Springfield

    I needed a 1943 Springfield to fill in the missing gap between 1942 and 1944, so this is what I wound up with. At first I was pleased there was no significant pitting above the wood, but once I took her out of the wood, it became obvious what the Pacific climate will do to one of these rifles when left unhindered for years on end. Thankfully the pitting isn’t too deep, so I may see about getting her “draw filled” or whatever the heck they call it when you fill pits in with a torch and some rod. But for now, at least her condition won’t get worse being with me. Might be a rainy day gunsmith project when I’m bored. Other than that little surprise, I am very pleased with the old girl. I got lock bar sights and an uncut oprod, plus one of the brand new Criterion barrels, so I can’t wait to send some lead down range this weekend, and see how tight a group I can make. One coat of tung oil is on the wood, more to follow. Also, I still have a Field Grade on order as well and I stickied for a 43 Springfield too, so we shall see what comes my way in a few weeks.

    #2
    Lock bar sights and uncut oprod
    Last edited by SA1941; 07-23-2020, 10:12 AM.

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      #3
      A shame about the pitting, but it still seems like there's a lot more good on it than not. I'll look forward to seeing your Field Grade!

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        #4
        The pitting is not that bad. I've seen worse. The description of a rack grade does allow for pitting. Yours is better than most others. Since it doesn't affect the performance of the rifle enjoy it for what it is. You are lucky you got an uncut op rod and lock bars sights.

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          #5
          Originally posted by jak View Post
          The pitting is not that bad. I've seen worse. The description of a rack grade does allow for pitting. Yours is better than most others. Since it doesn't affect the performance of the rifle enjoy it for what it is. You are lucky you got an uncut op rod and lock bars sights.
          I feel the same. The uncut oprod is a rare thing to come across. I’m pleased to have it. One day, I might get the pitting fixed, but your right, all things considered, it’s not awful bad. She will make a great shooter for sure, and I’m glad to give her a good home. As a side note, a friend of mine said that I can mix up some JB weld and use a business card for a spreader and fill the pitting in with. From there, it can be cerakoted over and baked at a low temperature to cure and avoid melting the JB weld. That will probably happen at some point, but for right now, I’m going to enjoy her as is.
          Last edited by SA1941; 07-24-2020, 12:14 AM.

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            #6
            What ever you do to it (hopefully nothing), DO NOT APPLY ANY HEAT TO IT!!!! You'll ruin the receiver's heat treatment and the LAST thing you want is soft spots in the receiver. Hell, the pitting gives it character and is a HUGE part of its history. It's been there and done that!! Treat the ol' veteran with care and it will return the favor 10-fold.
            Nice rifle. You hit a homer with the sights and op rod. Great score.
            Jon

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              #7
              Originally posted by SA1941 View Post
              Lock bar sights and uncut oprod
              +1 some great desirable parts and overall a very nice rifle, great score!
              m14brian

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                #8
                Originally posted by TJT View Post
                What ever you do to it (hopefully nothing), DO NOT APPLY ANY HEAT TO IT!!!! You'll ruin the receiver's heat treatment and the LAST thing you want is soft spots in the receiver. Hell, the pitting gives it character and is a HUGE part of its history. It's been there and done that!! Treat the ol' veteran with care and it will return the favor 10-fold.
                Nice rifle. You hit a homer with the sights and op rod. Great score.
                Jon
                Thanks Jon! I appreciate it! Back to my earlier comment though, allow me to clarify something that i wasn’t clear on. I should have been more specific, so I apologize for any confusion. Cerakote cures for roughly 2 hours at 230-250 degrees. Nowhere near hot enough to change any heat treatment properties. Besides, if it did adversely affect heat treatment, there would be millions of firearms affected by it. At those temps, you are approaching how hot it would be if a GI got into a furious firefight. About the same really. I redid a 1941 Springfield that had no finish left whatsoever, and it came out looking like Greek black parkerizing. Trust me, the pitting will never be eliminated, nor would I want it to be. The old warhorses have character as they should. This rifle has little to no collector value left, as her only value is now as a shooter. I hate that such neglect came to this rifle, however, now that it is in my possession, I would like to correct to an extent the damage that has been done. As with all my M1s, she will have the best of care as only she deserves for her service.

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                  #9
                  Target from 40 yards today. Lower string is the initial shots. After some sight adjustments, I got them pulled in in the top group. About 1 3/4” group for the top. Shot from prone with no bench rest. I’m beyond pleased. She’s capable of better. She just has to contend with a lousy operator. Haha!
                  Attached Files

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                    #10
                    I like your attitude. The Garand still has a lot to offer modern shooters as a general-purpose utility rifle. That's good shooting on the target. Good enough accuracy for any reasonable use.
                    The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
                    The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

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                      #11
                      The haters will hate. Therefore, let it be said up front that this is my rifle, and since she has no collector value left and is destined to be a shooter for me, I have done what I deem to be an improvement of her condition without taking away too much from her more than likely, storied past. I have indeed left some pitting behind. These are before and after JB Weld application pics with the most current pic taken tonight. Off to the smiths shop tomorrow for cerakote application in sig dark grey. That color best approximates the gray park she last had, and is also one of the most durable finishes to be put onto a firearm. No more rust from here on out. The wood has had two coats of linseed oil while it has been disassembled. Final pics will post later this week when she comes home.
                      Attached Files

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                        #12
                        What you are doing is taking a historical rifle and putting it into excellent functional condition. This is a good thing that will have it ready for service for generations to come. You will use it and enjoy this classic and give it a new life with appreciation.
                        The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
                        The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

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                          #13
                          She’s back! Worst of the pitting has been repaired.
                          Attached Files

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                            #14
                            She looks great!
                            m14brian

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                            • SA1941
                              SA1941 commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Thxs Brian. I’m pleased. Cerakote is a mighty fine durable finish. Should be on there for longer than the parkerizing with appropriate care.

                            #15
                            Nice! A real labor of love there, helping to preserve it from further damage. Good to see the finished result. Thanks for keeping us updated!

                            -Robyn

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