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    Question Regarding Connect Cleaning Rod

    Does anyone know which rod set up is correct for a WW2 Cleaning Pouch?

    is there a way in which to tell a wartime one including rods from a post war one?

    thank you!

    Scott
    Attached Files

    #2
    Post War rods are 4 piece that goes in small pouch in buttstock. The rods attach to a M10 combo tools

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks Orlando. Do you have any pics Of wartime rods?

      Thank you!

      Scott

      Comment


        #4
        What you have pictured is WWII cleaning rod

        Comment


          #5
          Perfect cheers mate!

          Scott

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Orlando View Post
            What you have pictured is WWII cleaning rod
            Hello! I am new on this forum and have recently become a first time Garand owner, despite being a WWII US enthusiast/collector for the past 7-8 years. I have a question regarding cleaning rods. What kind of cleaning rods were issued during WWII, roughly when were they used, and how were they issued? I've read that the one piece cleaning rods were common throughout the entirety of the war and were issued on a squad level. Is this correct? Also, do you have any information like this on other rods that were issued/used with the M1 Garand during WWII? Any information will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

            Comment


              #7
              If I recall correctly (feel free to correct me guys), originally, there was a multi-tool and an oiler tube with a pull-through cleaner and bore brush stored in the butt hole (phrasing) under the trap along with a small grease tub full of LubriPlate for field cleaning. The one piece rod (M3) was used when not in the field. Late (if not after the war), the multi-piece rod set with the different multi-tool took over the butt hole (phrasing) cleaning apparatus. The oiler/kit container was similar to the ones used in the M1903 rifles, but was plastic rather than nickel plated brass, but I think the first batch were the metal ones until upgrade to plastic. A similar shorter one was made for Tommy guns. Liberty Tree Collectors used to have all types available, but they aren't taking orders until after Dec 7, so you can't see what they look like or I'd have a link here for you to peruse. I'm sure there are other sites that can show you though.

              Comment


                #8
                MRusan you are correct. A long cleaning rod in a separate pouch won't make sense for a WWII infantryman. The pull through had been in use since before WWI and worked well enough for the bolt action rifles. It used a tube with an oil bottle at one end as with the M1903 and M1917. The second drilled hole in the Garand stock held the combination tool/chamber cleaner. The bolt action rifles just had one drilled hole for the tube with the pull-through and oil container.
                The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
                The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Smokey View Post
                  MRusan you are correct. A long cleaning rod in a separate pouch won't make sense for a WWII infantryman. The pull through had been in use since before WWI and worked well enough for the bolt action rifles. It used a tube with an oil bottle at one end as with the M1903 and M1917. The second drilled hole in the Garand stock held the combination tool/chamber cleaner. The bolt action rifles just had one drilled hole for the tube with the pull-through and oil container.
                  Lots of great information here! Where would the three piece rod that this post was originally about fall into place?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Arnhem44mad View Post
                    Does anyone know which rod set up is correct for a WW2 Cleaning Pouch?

                    is there a way in which to tell a wartime one including rods from a post war one?

                    thank you!

                    Scott
                    Their webpage finally opened up to peruse and I remembered to go and look.
                    Looks like they don't have the shorter brass oiler anymore (was for a Thompson, but was neat. Should have grabbed one when I saw them. Derp.)

                    Here's a listing of the various parts on their website for reference (you can find these items other places too):

                    Early combo tool (note different chamber cleaner end):
                    https://www.libertytreecollectors.co...&idcategory=30

                    Later combo tool:
                    https://www.libertytreecollectors.co...&idcategory=30

                    Brass version of the oiler (which has a chamber for the pull-through tools in it like the later one):
                    https://www.libertytreecollectors.co...&idcategory=30

                    Later (and most common) oiler tube (also with pull-through and brush chamber on one end):
                    https://www.libertytreecollectors.co...&idcategory=30

                    Combo tool for Korean era and later sets (Should fit in the pull through chamber of the oiler. Used as cleaning rod handle among other things):
                    https://www.libertytreecollectors.co...&idcategory=30

                    Same era cleaning rod kit that took the place of the original style combo tool and requires the above (last) combo tool to work:
                    https://www.libertytreecollectors.co...&idcategory=30

                    What looks like the above set without the smaller canvas bag (required to fit in the upper butt hole (phrasing) the cardboard tube won't):
                    https://www.libertytreecollectors.co...&idcategory=30

                    Complete later set including a waterproofed canvas bag for ruck carry:
                    https://www.libertytreecollectors.co...&idcategory=30

                    Pull-through (they also have just the pull-through metal parts in either brass or steel available):
                    https://www.libertytreecollectors.co...&idcategory=30

                    Strangely enough, they have the brush too:
                    https://www.libertytreecollectors.co...&idcategory=30

                    They didn't have the little grease tubs, but these sites do:

                    Original Lubriplate tubs (Sarco does too):
                    https://www.ammogarand.com/m1-garand...-wwii1130.html

                    Later Plastilube tubs:
                    http://www.civilianmarksmanship.com/...reasepots.html

                    The grease tubs go in the same hole as the big combo tool or cleaning rod canvas bag with the bag pull tab under it so you can pull the tub out.
                    You can see in the field manual (FM 23-5) how it all goes in on page 22 of the May 1965 edition (great reference for oiling and greasing points too).

                    BTW: another really great reference:
                    https://www.amazon.com/23-10-Rifle-C.../dp/B007APAELI

                    Has the full description of mounting and using the M1923, M1907, and M1 improved web slings the right way.
                    (Go here if you just want that sling section: https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/para...ng-t37815.html)

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by WWIIman1942 View Post

                      Lots of great information here! Where would the three piece rod that this post was originally about fall into place?
                      Most likely used in garrison or armory cleaning like the one piece rods were.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        They were used in the field. Most of them were used with machine guns and were preferred by many guys carrying Garands. Once you have had a pull through break in the barrel you will never do it again. Many soldiers didn’t like carrying the stuff in the butt because it added weight and it rattled. There are many pictures of soldiers carrying the pouch above and using rods in the war. Just look on the web or in Canfield’s latest book, I can think of at least a couple and maybe more in there.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by MRusan View Post

                          Most likely used in garrison or armory cleaning like the one piece rods were.
                          So they were supposed to use the pull through in the field and rods in "the rear" and in garrison? But there was use of rods in the field, correct? Would one of these three piece rods in the pouch (like the one at the beginning of the post) have been common? Would it be shared within a squad if someone had one?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            The 3-piece cleaning rod may have been carried in the backpack with other supplies, food, etc. I'm not familiar with it. The 4-piece rod set is what I keep in the buttstock. I would usually get two sets, and reject the ones that don't assemble straight. I have used it occasionally while out in the woods.
                            I also keep an empty case with just a live primer on me as well. If I accidently slip and the muzzle gets some snow or other in stuff in it, the primer blows everything out and leaves the bore clean and dry.
                            The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
                            The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by WWIIman1942 View Post

                              So they were supposed to use the pull through in the field and rods in "the rear" and in garrison? But there was use of rods in the field, correct? Would one of these three piece rods in the pouch (like the one at the beginning of the post) have been common? Would it be shared within a squad if someone had one?
                              I'm betting that the original thought was to use the pull-through strictly in the field until someone pointed out that there are situations where a pull-through just can't do what needs being done, like clearing a blockage. They probably had a few one-piecers available per squad (like in a vehicle or with a couple of designated soldiers) until the collapsible ones became available. I personally like the later sets from the Korean era forward that stay in the butt hole (phrasing) since everyone could carry one. Only downside is, they lost the broken case extractor of the older combo tool (which could come in handy). I'm sure someone out there knows this for sure.

                              BTW: Found a great photo of where everything goes in stock storage.

                              Click image for larger version

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