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How loose is too loose for front stock piece?

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    How loose is too loose for front stock piece?

    I picked up my first ever Garand from my FFL last night. She is truly a sight to behold. Wish I had thought to take some pictures before I left for work this morning so I could share. I had a question concerning the section of the stock closest to the muzzle, not sure if you'd still call that the fore-grip or what. On my rifle this piece is loose and can slide back and forth, either towards the muzzle or the buttstock. If I had to guess I'd say there is about an 1/8" of play or so. I have read conflicting reports that this piece should be locked down to help with barrel harmonics/accuracy, wheres several folks are saying that it should be loose as this provides a little slack for the stock to expand in the heat of battle. I tend to believe that it needs to be loose and there is nothing wrong with it but I was wondering if there was a definitive answer.

    #2
    It needs to have some movement, 1/8 sounds excessive. Only time there is no movement is with a National Match rifle the guard is glued and screwed
    You can try this, remove the gas screw ,turn the gas lock one revolution. If there is still slight movement reinstall the gas screw.

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      #3
      This^^^^. As always, Bill is spot-on.
      Jon

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        #4
        The forward handguard is supposed to be a little rattle loose to prevent putting tension on the barrel. Once it heats up that tension is gone and the point of impact will go way off. I learned this 33 years ago with my first Garand.
        The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
        The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

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          #5
          For a deeper understanding of the relationship between the Front Hand Guard and the Gas Cylinder, I would suggest this page on the CMP website;
          http://thecmp.org/training-tech/armo.../gas-cylinder/

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