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1945 Springfield Uncut Op Rod, all correct except stock

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  • 1945 Springfield Uncut Op Rod, all correct except stock

    I recently bought my first M1 Garand after over a year of research and searching for one (didn't like the idea of ordering from cmp and crossing my fingers). Ended up buying a Springfield 1945 with uncut op rod and all correct parts except the rear sight and stock which I think may be a post war Harrington & Richardson stock. Paid $1200

    Inspired me to make a video about the History & Features M1 Garand! Check it out let me know how you think I did!
    https://youtu.be/dDzGS0B-h6o
    https://youtu.be/dDzGS0B-h6o

    Pics of the gun:

  • #2
    More pics:
    l

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    • #3
      Nice looking machine PP. The correct stock would be SA/NFR. They're not too difficult to find but a little pricey but not so much that you'll need to mortgage the house and sell your first-born male child. Also, don't fall into the hole about not shooting an un-cut op rod. One of my M1's (my DCM "one per life time") has an un-cut rod and I've been shooting it for 40 years. Remember too, that WWII was fought and won with millions of un-cut op rods. It'll be fine as long as you don't shoot rifle-grenades with it. Just be sure to shoot only M1 specific ammo in it.
      Jon
      Last edited by TJT; 10-01-2019, 11:54 PM.

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      • RCS
        RCS commented
        Editing a comment
        firing rifle grenades will not damage the operating rod - the bolt and operating do not recoil as the gas is vented out through
        the special gas cylinder screw

      • TJT
        TJT commented
        Editing a comment
        I know firing RG's won't hurt the op rod. I was trying to inject a littls humor. I guess I failed.
        Jon

    • #4
      Outstanding! Congrats ion a very nice late 3.8 million that certainly appears to be wonderfully close to original - what a great score (I don't find these to be nearly as common as I think they should be).

      The hard part is that the rifle appears excellent so you are going to have to find some really nice parts to finish her up appropriately (IMHO). They will be on the high end of the scale price-wise, but take your time, it is all still out there. If you really get lucky, maybe you will even score a stock assembly. Laugh if you want, but honestly, you may have to buy a whole rifle to get that stock - sometimes it is the best (and cheapest) way to get what you need!

      Congrats again.

      (What?? You guys know they are like Jays potato chips - you can't have just one. I'm just helping him realize it! )

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      • #5
        I'm late to this thread, but I had to comment on what a great piece you have! i've been looking for one in this range for years. You've probably already discovered that the stock you show appears to be an excellent (post WWII) HRA. That style stock (1/2" DAS") starts to show up around serial 5.5M and continues through end of HRA production in 1956. In that condition, your stock is highly sought after, and would certainly sell for enough to put a dent in the cost of a correct stock. One thing to ponder is that rifles in your serial number range and barrel date can also be "correct" with the SA/SHM stock. An NFR would be the most likely, but putting on a "matching" SA/SHM stock would make this really stand out.! (That's what I would do FWIW). One last note, the A-10 heat lot on your bolt is a heat lot that is found on early postwar SA production (4.2M and up range). So, leftover heat treated steel from late WWII era was used to make the early post war SA bolts. Those late WWII receivers have a lot of interesting tidbits! Congrats on a great rifle.....I'm truly jealous.
        PS: Don't do anything to that HRA stock!!!
        George in Texas

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