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  • Newbie needs help

    Hey all, new here and new to Garands. I am currently actively looking for my first Garand and need any help or advice you may have to offer. I am looking for something that is correct, not in terrible shape and shoots well. I want something that shows its history and story and not a trophy gun that has been restored. And yes I would truly like to find something that was issued and served in WWll so 41-45 but preference to 44 or before. I don't know exactly what to look for (SN range, Ex) or where to go. I have been on gunbroker.com and there is a lot to sort through. Any thoughts or pointers? Thanks for your time.

  • #2
    Drifter,
    I'm gonna' tell you the answer you don't want to hear--it takes YEARS and YEARS of studying these rifles, not an internet crash-course in a couple of nights to learn what you want to know. My advice to you is to find someone very knowledgeable on the M1 rifle (again, someone who has studied the M1 rifle and not reliant on an internet crash-course) and when you find a rifle you're interested in, take your new-found friend with you to check it out. There are waaaaay too many places and ways to get thoroughly hosed if you don't know what to look for or what you're looking at. I know this isn't what you want to hear but it's the sad truth. Good luck in your endeavor. Keep us posted.
    Jon
    Last edited by TJT; 05-08-2019, 04:05 PM.

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    • #3
      I would argue that most guns that are correct don't have alot of history. That just isn't how it worked. If you find a WW2 M1 that is all correct and wasn't made that way by a collector, essentially you are asking for an original, that's going to be a tough find. If I were you, I would order a CMP SG and sticky it for WW2 vintage. Then you'll likely get a fine shooting rifle with good history, and maybe even a bunch of correct parts.

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      • #4
        And I totally agree with TJT. I have read every book I can get my hands on, talked to everyone I can find who is into these rifles, and cruise all of these boards religiously for information. And I can tell you, I have yet to get a rifle that I haven't had to do some research on in order to understand it. Honestly, that's a huge part of the fun. There are so many variations, modifications, revisions, heat lots manufacturers etc. In my opinion if you rush it you're doing yourself a disservice. Get a CMP Service Grade rifle. Take it apart, learn about what you have, shoot it and then decide what you want the next one to be. I have yet to receive a SG from CMP that I couldn't sell for at least what I bought it for, so you really aren't risking much. The truth however, is that I've also never been able to sell one because I love each one I get.

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        • #5
          Here is your serial# list.
          http://usriflecal30m1.com/ProductionGraph.aspx

          As others have said you are not going to get the advice you want in a couple of posts. Very few WWII garands in original condition exist and if you do actually find one be prepared to pay big $$$$$$. That's where the research comes into play and you have to do that on your own so you don't get ripped off. If you do find a rifle you like, post detailed pictures of the rifle and individual parts on the forum before you purchase it.

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          • #6
            A "military correct" rifle can be obtained from the CMP. That would be a rifle that almost certainly was overhauled at least once, but is in the configuration the military last had it in, almost certainly a mixmaster. They were required to be safe, reliable and meet a minimum accuracy requirement; fit for issue to a combat infantryman.
            https://www.americanrifleman.org/art...rand-rebuilds/
            While some "corrected" rifles may be safe to use, it's not guaranteed; especially if barrels and/or bolts were changed out. That risks headspace problems. Other parts might be out of spec such as operating rods, etc which would risk functional problems.

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            • #7
              Plenty of us restore Garands and make them period correct. Why? Why not, it is a hobby. I do not recommend it, like smoking.
              Some Garands come out just right in appearance.

              https://www.gunbroker.com/item/808573781

              This seller pretty much only sells what appear to be correctly restored, or original guns. I am sure that this is what you are looking for.
              Last edited by Redleg; 05-13-2019, 05:52 PM.

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              • #8
                Is it me or did it sell on the high side of the high side?

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                • #9
                  Yup, I cant ever find sellers with deep pockets when I sell something

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                  • #10
                    Drifter.45lc Suggest you buy a service grade from the CMP if you want a rifle with some history. It'll be in good condition and probably an ordinance rebuild. It you want a really nice Garand to use, get a Special from the CMP, it'll be more expensive, but nearly a brand-new rifle. (The receiver will be old but inspected and refinished.)

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