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My Springfield '45

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    My Springfield '45

    I have had this rifle for 26-27 years. I bought it off the "junk" rack at a local gun shop. Used too, the cheap guns were on the floor in racks, anything of value was behind the counter.
    Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

    Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

    Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

    Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr





    #2
    Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

    Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

    Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

    Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

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      #3
      Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

      Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

      Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

      Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

      Comment


        #4
        Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

        Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

        I do have some questions and comments.
        I have been told that the black painted may be military. I was told that USMC and USAF armorers would sometimes paint the gas cylinder black. Have you ever heard of such?
        The July'45 barrel and March '45 receiver is unusual. On original rifles it should be 3'45 barrel.....7'45 receiver would make more sense, then again being so close...it may be legit.
        The filled hole in the stock makes me wonder.
        There is an anomaly in the grain at the pistol grip. It may be a crack....if so it's been expertly repaired as it never opened up in the nearly 30 years I have had it and there is no evidence of a amateur repair there. There is a mark on the left side of the stock. Stake mark? The crack or anomaly does not go past it.
        Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr
        The crack does not go down the right side of the buttstock.
        I consider it a shooter so please share opinions good or bad.

        Comment


          #5
          I read an old Army overhaul manual many years ago that specified a baked-on black paint finish for the gas cylinder to get rid of the "shine" from the bare stainless steel. Don't remember what was used for paint. It inspired me to use black semi-dull charcoal grill paint on my shiny gas cylinder and bake it in the oven. Not correct but it's worked well for thirty years.
          The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
          The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

          Comment


          • 54ball
            54ball commented
            Editing a comment
            Thank you for that information on blackening the gas cylinder..
            On a related note the US M1803 rifle, Yes 1803 Harpers Ferry are sometimes found with a brownish varnish...even on the barrel and lock.
            Period US manuals(mostly plagiarized from the British Baker manuals) recommend browning or greening these rifles in the field with a tinted camphor varnish if they became shiny and reflected glare.. Rifle Corps at this time advocated stealth and preferred their arms to be browned and non reflective. Regulars on the other hand proffered their arms (1795 Springfield Muskets) to be in the bright. Regulars also wore blue uniforms with red and white facings while the Rifle Regiments wore green frocks and trousers trimmed in yellow fringe.

            What I'm getting at is sometimes non original things maybe very period correct field modifications or maintenance. This goes way back...way, way back.
            Last edited by 54ball; 04-08-2019, 01:22 AM.

          #6
          The NFR marked stock is correct for that serial number range. M1 rifles were NOT assembled in sequential order. Receivers were numbered and stock piled and assembled at random. I would hazard a guess that the barrel is original to the receiver. It appears there are more than just a couple of correct parts on the rifle. Notice I said "correct" and not "original". Originality is difficult--yea, nigh-on impossible to determine. Judging by the rear sight, the rifle has been through at least one rebuild program. Remember this: a rifle is only original ONCE--that is the moment it leaves the armory.
          Jon

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          • 54ball
            54ball commented
            Editing a comment
            Thank you for that very concise reply..

          #7
          The gas cylinder lock is from the 1950s as its a high hump. Gas cylinder appears to be a narrow base and saw cut. Gas cylinder should be wide base with out saw cut. Rear sights should be lock bar sights. Can you post photo of op rod drawing number and photo where op rod handle where it mates with tube. 1945 vintage M1 Garands are among the easiest to restore.

          Comment


          • 54ball
            54ball commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks.photos are below.

          #8
          The op rod should be a flat-side -9.
          Jon

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          • 54ball
            54ball commented
            Editing a comment
            Thank you. The rod does have a 9 in the middle prefix.

          #9
          Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

          Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

          Untitled by Travis Brown, on Flickr

          Thank you all so much for the replies.

          Comment


            #10
            Thank you for the additional photos. The op rod has the radius cut. Referred to as a cut op rod vs an uncut op rod This modification was done as preventive measure to prevent cracking.
            Last edited by RDS; 04-08-2019, 03:32 PM.

            Comment


              #11
              Originally posted by TJT View Post
              The op rod should be a flat-side -9.
              Jon
              There were 2 kinds of -9 op rods: early has a radiused outside and late has the flat side. I need a picture of your op rod on the outside of where the right side bolt lug rides in it. Need the pic from the end, not straight on to determine if radiused or flat. Take 3 or 4 from different angles.
              Jon

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