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Would replacing a CMP replacement stock with an original increase value?

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    Would replacing a CMP replacement stock with an original increase value?

    I have a SA 1940s (#69xxx) M1 Garand with a replacement stock on it that I received from the CMP. I was wondering how much it would effect the re-sale value if I put an original stock on it. Would it change the value much if at all? I'm not a big fan of the replacement stock it has on it. It looks to pristine and perfect for a Garand. It almost has a plastic look to it.

    #2
    The short answer is "No". You'll pay more for the wood than what you'll get for it upon selling the rifle unless you part it out. The proper stock will set you back north of $400 easily. It also will depend on how much of the rest of the rifle MIGHT be original, or at least "correct". Remember, a rifle was ONLY ORIGINAL ONCE--that was the day it left the armory. No matter how much time and $$ you put in it, it will NEVER be original again--EVER.
    Jon
    Last edited by TJT; 01-08-2019, 01:06 PM.

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      #3
      Originally posted by TJT View Post
      The short answer is "No". You'll pay more for the wood than what you'll get for it upon selling the rifle unless you part it out. The proper stock will set you back north of $400 easily. It also will depend on how much of the rest of the rifle MIGHT be original, or at least "correct". Remember, a rifle was ONLY ORIGINAL ONCE--that was the day it left the armory. No matter how much time and $$ you put in it, it will NEVER be original again--EVER.
      Jon
      Thanks for the feedback TJT. I appreciate it!

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        #4
        Nearly every Garand made went through this process at least once:
        https://www.americanrifleman.org/art...rand-rebuilds/
        The resulting rifle was required to be safe, reliable and meet a minimum accuracy standard.
        It had to be good enough for issue to a combat infantryman.
        The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
        The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

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          #5
          There are still some originals around plus all the thousands of Lend Lease rifles that were returned still in original condition. Not all the early receivers had the 7th round correction as examples are also still around too..

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            #6
            OK, every question has several answers that can be given depending on who is reading - you can speak to the newest of folks or you can go right to what the latest ideas and questions that are raised by any given subject. As we have a nice mix of new guys and old guys here so in spite of the OP being from a newer person, I am first going to leap-frog all of you down to the other end of the spectrum and give you guys an idea of what goes on there down the road when you have been playing with these for a several decades or so, and then I will try to give you an answer to the OP.

            An original, correct SPG marked stock for that serial number is so far beyond rare that I would jokingly say it is made of "unobtainium" (in other words, don't get your hopes up). But further, in addition, the correct cartouche for that very small serial range around that number is actually still a matter of some considerable debate currently (cool!). One camp says it is correct to have the WWII only narrow SPG and ONLY a narrow SPG mark on it, while the other quietly allows that the fat lettered SPG is known to have existed prior to WWII and was used in 03's, and point to things such as one gorgeous example late in gastrap production that turned up with that fat letter SPG long before the theories were proposed and debate even began. The debate rages and examples and good arguments are made in both directions, sometimes with considerable, ummm, ... energy, ...

            This is the background stuff that I find most interesting and colors my answer. To answer the original question if you haven't gathered yet, I would tell to not bother. Even if you could find said early stock with either cartouche, it would cost you an arm and a leg (way past 400.00). If you had an original gun that lacked only a correct stock then perhaps, but otherwise, nah. Then if you did find one and are restoring you would have to find a set of keystones, a type one rod, and uber rare barrel that is not a tomato stake, and the list goes on and on and expensively on.

            Me, I'd shoot it as is and enjoy it and love the fact that you have something made prior to WWII and most likely served with distinction on any part of the globe in any number of conflicts over the past many years before it came to your hands, and even if sitting on a shelf did more to encourage peace by its mere presence than any bleating anti-war protester could ever do (sorry, my humble opinion and I often digress as such, ...). It is quite something all by itself and even more so that after all this time you can still take it out and use it as intended. If the stock really bugs you then maybe look for a stock set from the era of the barrel date - that could be nice (though some of the new stuff looks pretty good). Maybe then start looking for something more original if you want 'collectible', ...

            AMHO. Best all.
            Last edited by Bodyman; 01-09-2019, 10:51 AM. Reason: zzzz, ...

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              #7
              Originally posted by Bodyman View Post
              ... I am first going to leap-frog all of you down to the other end of the spectrum and give you guys an idea of what goes on there down the road when you have been playing with these for a several decades or so
              I fit in that category. When I started down this rabbit hole, there was no internet. One had to read, actually WRITE letters (and hope to get answers), ask lots of questions--especially of the guys that were there and used them daily ( like my father who was a SWPA WWII vet) and a lot of sleuthing in general.
              I can also proudly count Joe Poyer and Craig Reich--both well-respected, published authors and firearms historians--in my circle of personal friends.
              Jon
              Last edited by TJT; 01-09-2019, 01:46 PM.

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                #8
                TJT is exactly correct. Unless you have expendable funds correcting a 6 digit will be prohibitively expensive. But, to simply find and install the correct stock will definately increase it's value. The problem is not enough to make any money on it if you sell it. Value up? Yes. More than you'll have invested? Not even close. Also you have to deal with the fact that a 6-digit mixmaster has no greater value than any mixmaster WWII Garand. Some would say even less since the cost of correcting it renders it a very bad investment. A correct short pinion rear sight will cost you near the entire value of the rifle as is. You could easily have 400% of the rifle value in it once it's correct.

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                  #9
                  You could consider the CMP to be another Garand overhaul facility, like the ones that overhauled so many in military inventory (I'll probably get flogged for this statement). In my experience the CMP walnut stock sets are excellent and help provide an accurate shooting rifle. I also recommend you keep it and use it as is.
                  The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
                  The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thank you all very much for the info!

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