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    Questions about an M1 Garand please.

    I am new here and I have three questions, How do I find out the year of manufacture of my rifle? It is a Springfield serial number 3012188.

    Also, it has the sheet metal trigger guard. Is that problematic on the M1 Garand? Do I need to change it to the milled trigger guard. I haven't even removed the stock on this rifle yet to see if it has mixed parts.

    After cleaning the bore the rifling looks really bright and shiny without pitting. Is there an easy way to check for excessive muzzle wear?

    Thanks for any help, Jim

    #2
    Your garand was manufactured during July, 1944
    http://myplace.frontier.com/~aleccorapinski/id11.html

    There is nothing wrong with a stamped trigger guard. A couple million postwar garands have them.
    Now if the trigger guard doesn't stay latched when firing or latches into the stock real easy...let us know.

    If this is your only garand, don't waste money on buying a muzzle gauge. Borrow one if you can.
    To roughly check for muzzle wear, put a 30-06 bullet in the muzzle. If it doesn't swallow the bullet, you are probably in good shape.
    If there are no nicks or gouges in the barrel crown, you are in good shape.
    The best way to check the rifle is to shoot it. If it shoots good, that's great. If it doesn't shoot well, then it might be the rifle,
    but if you're like me, it's mostly the shooter.
    Last edited by jak; 09-24-2018, 12:19 PM.

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      #3
      Make sure you grease it well, everywhere. Don't use the rifle without a good "lubing". Any good automotive grease will do a good job.
      The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
      The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

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        #4
        This is my first M1 Garand and I hope to take it to the range this week with the wife. When inserting the bullet into the muzzle there is exactly 1/8" of an inch from the crown to the brass case.

        I have been watching videos on YouTube on disassembly and reassembly so I will do that before I fire it. It will get a good greasing. I was given about 50 rounds of mil surplus ammo with it. Hopefully I can keep them on the target! Thank you so much for your help.

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          #5
          Originally posted by Jim in Illinois View Post
          When inserting the bullet into the muzzle there is exactly 1/8" of an inch from the crown to the brass case.
          Your muzzle is roughly between a 2 and a 3.

          Disassembly and reassembly
          http://www.civilianmarksmanship.com/detailstrip.html
          http://www.civilianmarksmanship.com/reassembly.html

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            #6
            Thanks jak, Is that good or bad? What is better a higher number or lower number? Remember, this is all new to me.

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              #7
              Lower is better. Between 2 and 3 is darn good, not as good as a 1 or a 0 (new), but your rifle should be a good shooter, at least in that respect! My own rifle is a 2+, and I was darn glad to get it! Most at the CMP store that day were 3,4, even 5 - and mostly more expensive too!

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                #8
                The bullet test is not real accurate. I just gaged some of my take off barrels. I gaged one that showed 1/8 on bullet test and it measures a 4 which is fairly worn
                Don't worry about the wear, the proof is on paper not by a gage. If crown isn't dinged up I am sure it will be fine for casual range use

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