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    Need some help

    Just bought this M1 about a month ago. It's a May of 1944 Springfield. 1953 Springfield Barrel ARL Ordnance Arlington Virginia. 1944 Springfield trigger group wra safety.Stock was worn out. Replaced the stock, took it to the range. First shot was a FTE. Ripped the rim off the case, shell she stuck. I succeed in removing the shell With a cleaning rod.diagnosed, apparently barrel hadn't been cleaned, lot of carbon buildup near gas hole, and gas cylinder.also chamber had a surface coat light rust. Ran some steel wool on a Barb with wd 40 to cut the rust.cleaned the barrel, and replaced the op rod spring.Kerri Ann is a shooter now.
    What I wanted to ask was,on the right side receiver legs sre these markings, rear leg 7, front legY, 0,6,E, and a figure if a diamond. Any ideas as to what they mean, any help appreciated.
    Last edited by Jsavicki; 05-21-2018, 05:43 PM.

    #2

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      #3
      What were you using for ammo? The rifle should have been taken apart, cleaned, inspected and thoroughly greased on re-assembly before you fired it. A properly maintained Garand will eject forward and slightly to the right, at around 1:00 o'clock except for the last round from the clip. That will go more to the side. After firing, the barrel and chamber should get a light film of oil as a minimum to protect from corrosion. I often wipe the exterior metal surfaces with the oily patch after. Wipe the oil out of the chamber and bore before shooting it again. I use a one-piece stainless .22 steel cleaning rod with a brass ferrule to keep it centered at the muzzle. By no means use a jointed aluminum rod. The joints will damage the bore. Sapphire is one of the hardest gemstones and it's an aluminum oxide crystal. As a general practice, don't let the cleaning rod itself touch the inside of the barrel.
      Last edited by Smokey; 07-04-2018, 07:27 PM.
      The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
      The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

      Comment


        #4
        The stamps are sub-inspector markings and the steal lot and heat treat numbers the diamond stamp signifies the receiver was made from 8620 steel. And by the way Arlington Ord was a importer.

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          #5
          Buy yourself some Bore Paste, stick enough fine steel wool on a patch holder to fit tight in the chamber, add the Paste and buff the chamber using an aluminum rod attached, inserted down the muzzle and a drill. Buff it well. No, the steel wool will not damage the chamber. Avoid moving it far enough forward to contact the rifling at the throat. You generally end up with a chamber as pristine as new. And throw away the WD40. Buy some Kroil snd quality gun oil. WD is great for removing label sticky stuff from your beer glass labels and helping squeaks in door hinges but has no use in a gun cleaning kit. Bad lubricant, poor rust remover and preventer, terrible penetrating oil. Useless. And no, during this process the rod will not damage the bore. Hearsay. And no, contact at the muzzle will not damage the muzzle. Hearsay.

          You will end up with a damn clean and polished chamber though.👍
          Last edited by lapriester; 07-17-2018, 03:57 PM.

          Comment


            #6
            Here's another approach. Buy an AIM Sports 30/06 Chamber Brush

            :
            https://www.amazon.com/garand-chambe...hamber%20brush

            Use as is, or wrap it with fine steel wool, put some oil on it, and use it to clean the chamber.
            The chamber does not need to be mirror smooth.


            There's a lot of controversy over cleaning rods and barrel damage. I like to play it safe.
            Another reason not to use WD-40, the stuff kills primers.
            Last edited by Smokey; 07-19-2018, 04:16 PM.
            The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
            The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

            Comment


              #7
              Google the formula for Ed's Red. I use a formulation of it, and it melts carbon like magic. Best stuff ever. Run a bore snake through the barrel after I loosen the soot up with the GI chamber brush. Bore snakes are great because they are combination of patches and wire brush. And they don't nick the crown of your barrel like a cleaning rod could do (as some people have said). Plus, you could easily store your snake in a plastic bag in the stock and take it with you wherever without carrying around a rod in it's case.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by SA1941 View Post
                Google the formula for Ed's Red. I use a formulation of it, and it melts carbon like magic. Best stuff ever. Run a bore snake through the barrel after I loosen the soot up with the GI chamber brush. Bore snakes are great because they are combination of patches and wire brush. And they don't nick the crown of your barrel like a cleaning rod could do (as some people have said). Plus, you could easily store your snake in a plastic bag in the stock and take it with you wherever without carrying around a rod in it's case.
                So does 2 stroke oil, I like the syn formula... Have you ever looked at the top eyelet of a fishing pole that mono filament still wears a groove so don't think a bore snake is perfect they get dirty and need washed out.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Phil McGrath View Post

                  So does 2 stroke oil, I like the syn formula... Have you ever looked at the top eyelet of a fishing pole that mono filament still wears a groove so don't think a bore snake is perfect they get dirty and need washed out.
                  Thanks for the 2 stroke oil suggestion. I have never heard of that one before. I wash my snakes every six months, depending on usage. I have gone for extended periods of time without shooting, and therefore, I have had no need to clean them.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Smokey View Post
                    Here's another approach. Buy an AIM Sports 30/06 Chamber Brush

                    :
                    https://www.amazon.com/garand-chambe...hamber%20brush

                    Use as is, or wrap it with fine steel wool, put some oil on it, and use it to clean the chamber.
                    The chamber does not need to be mirror smooth.


                    There's a lot of controversy over cleaning rods and barrel damage. I like to play it safe.
                    Another reason not to use WD-40, the stuff kills primers.
                    The ratchet type chamber brushes are garbage and are incapable of doing even a marginal job getting a chamber clean that has any signs of corrosion of heavy buildup. That's a fact.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      "By no means use a jointed aluminum rod. The joints will damage the bore."

                      I'm sorry but this actually made me laugh. Yes, over use of any jointed rod is not good but an aluminum rod is never going to do significant damage or even insignificant damage to a bore unless you spin it there 10's of thousands of rotations and imbedd the aluminum into the lands and grooves. Even the importance of using a bore guide is very questionable. Verifiable testing was done by the GCA where they purposely stroked a Garand bore 10's of thousands of times with a jointed steel rod, making sure to rub the insides and muzzle with the rod. No noticeable decrease in accuracy was a result and even after somewhere around 66K strokes the MW increased, if I remember right, only one number.

                      https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?url...5&share_type=t
                      Last edited by lapriester; 08-01-2018, 04:41 PM.

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                        #12
                        OK, I have been duly informed of the errors of my ways, but I'll still be careful with my own rifles.
                        I did some snooping and it seems some of the muzzle erosion could be caused by hot gas blasting out, with a hot barrel to accelerate the process.
                        The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
                        The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          It is my understanding that repeated launching of practice rifle grenades causes muzzle wear.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by RDS View Post
                            It is my understanding that repeated launching of practice rifle grenades causes muzzle wear.
                            He's probably not going to have to worry much about that, LOL. At least I hope not anyway.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by lapriester View Post

                              He's probably not going to have to worry much about that, LOL. At least I hope not anyway.
                              My comment was directed at causes of muzzle wear. I examined hundreds of hundreds of M1 Garands imported from Korea that had extreme muzzle wear, but very low TE numbers. Some as low as TE 2 but muzzle completely wiped out.

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