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M1 garand Combination cleaning tool

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    M1 garand Combination cleaning tool

    Hi My name is Sjoerd.

    Recently i bought a springfield armory M1 garand dated august 1944.
    When i opened the buttstock there was a combination cleaning tool, but somehow i cant find the exact same one on the internet.
    It looks a litte like a M3 combination tool. There are no markings on it.

    Can someone tell me what the exact name of this tool is and maybe how it is used?

    Thank you in advance





    #2
    That looks like an M3A1 tool that someone modified by replacing the brush with a rod. That is not a standard USGI multi tool. Early tools did not have a brush and had a patch holder for swabbing out the chamber. See the tools in this picture in an eBay auction: http://www.ebay.com/itm/M1-GARAND-TA...MAAOSwNnRYjkxK

    The two on the right are early USGI multi tools with the slotted, solid patch holder. As you can see, the one you pictured looks nothing like them.

    Here you go. I found this in Numrich. I'm not sure I understand completely what it's supposed to do but, it seems it IS a USGI part that's been put on your tool for a specific purpose.
    https://www.gunpartscorp.com/ad/1087480.htm

    They say it's a "high-speed extractor removal tool" but, the extractor is on an M1 bolt so I don't see how this tool would do as Numrich says. But, of course, Numrich is known for their Num-ass descriptions of the things they sell so it's hard to take what they say seriously.

    Here it is again: http://www.thegunner.net/ccp8/index....7ih008zz7804r0

    But they describe it as a first pattern tool, which it isn't. The first pattern has the patch holder on it. Anyway, it is a USGI "something" tool. Hell, it might even be a bit rare. I doubt Numrich sells many of the "conversions".
    Last edited by lapriester; 02-03-2017, 02:34 AM.

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      #3
      You use the M3A1 tool the same way you would with the brush. The tool without the brush just makes it easier to turn and extract from the bore after it is used to remove the extractor. Bill Ricca on his web site even indicates it was used in this manner. I believe we must have sent a ton of the modified tools to the Danes because it seamed when Danish garands were being imported back into the states, etc., they were readily available at all the gun shows. I don't notice them anymore but they were quite common.

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        #4
        An interesting story (found in Billy Pyle's book "The Gas Trap Garand". The early screw blade on the M3 tool did not fit the narrow screw slot on the short butt plate screw (which was the same screw slot size as the M1903 and M1 carbine butt plate screws) and the narrow screw slot was widened in Dec 1941. So on your early rifles, your M3 tool with the long screw driver blade should not fit the early top butt plate screw slot to be correct. The M1903 screw is not quite the same screw but does have the early screw slot.

        The two prongs are used to remove the flush nut

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          #5
          Originally posted by CCyooper View Post
          You use the M3A1 tool the same way you would with the brush. The tool without the brush just makes it easier to turn and extract from the bore after it is used to remove the extractor. Bill Ricca on his web site even indicates it was used in this manner. I believe we must have sent a ton of the modified tools to the Danes because it seamed when Danish garands were being imported back into the states, etc., they were readily available at all the gun shows. I don't notice them anymore but they were quite common.
          That would apply to the early patch holder type. That's not what he has there. His doesn't have the patch holding slot.

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            #6
            The tool has nothing to do with patches, etc., it was modified (from what others indicate) as a expedient tool to remove extractors, i.e, insert that long shaft in the barrel, close the bolt, give it a twist and off pops the extractor. The extension as far as I can tell serves no function other to align the tool in the barrel. Because it is brushless it is much easier to operate. Machts nichts to me as I just use a set of needle nose pliers or a screwdriver.

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              #7
              But there is an early tool with a patch holder. http://www.ebay.com/itm/M1-GARAND-TA...MAAOSwNnRYjkxK

              Thanks CCyooper for explaining how the extractor removal tool part of this works. You learn something new every day. :-)

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                #8
                when I was an armorer, the only tool used on the M1 and M14 bolts was the M10 with a short length of cleaning rod to turn the tool. I could remove a M1 rifle firing pin without taking the rifle apart.

                The M3A1 was in butt stock for field use

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