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    Help identifying Garand

    Greetings Ladies and Gents,
    I am brand new here so please excuse me if I posted this in the wrong forum. I bought a M1 Garand off of my grandfather a few months ago and I really love the thing. I was just wondering if you guys could help me identify the markings further than I already have and help me identify it better. I am sure the barrel and the Receiver match and both would indicate a 1950s manufacture date. The marks i wrote down were:
    Receiver:
    ~Lower Right Side: (B 4-1) (D 28291 35)
    ~Heel: Springfield Armory S/N 38843963
    Op Rod: 6585382 SA
    Bolt: D28287 -19SA A-6
    Barrel: S-A-10-51 (also on the barrel is a t shaped mark with a curved hook under it)
    Trigger Assembly: D28290-12-SA

    Any information would be helpful, thanks. I am not trying to make a fortune from selling it, was just checking it out before i tried to turn it into a tanker Garand (would have bought a new barrel and whatnot so the original parts wouldn't be chopped). I think it is a fully matching piece (Minus the stock which is a different type of wood from the handguard). I am gonna keep it together and probably buy a receiver if i can find one and build a tanker rifle separate.

    #2
    Something is wrong with the serial number, you have to many digits. I suppose its a 3.8 mil which would make it at the end of 1945 WWII. From the list of parts it has been rebuilt atleast once as it is a mix of WWII and Post War parts

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      #3
      Here is the best pic I could take of the heel without revealing too much of my messy room aha, but that stinks. I still want another m1 to mess around with but I will just replace the stock. My Grandfather disagrees, but I am adamant that the stock is a different type of wood than the handguard and it looks very wack, yo.

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        #4
        Yes its a late 1945 WWII rifle

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          #5
          3.8 million SA would date from May-June of '45. The barrel has a date of '51--NOT original to the receiver. The op rod would be a -9 flat side un-cut. The trigger housing would be a -16 if my rememberer is correct. The rear sight is the post-war T105E type. From what little of the stock I can see, it looks like walnut to me. Remember that walnut coloring can range from blond heartwood to the darker, almost black that one usually associates with walnut. Remember too, that during a build, or rebuild, the object was to have a working rifle to be issued and no attempt was made to "match" the wood or any other parts. Collectors 50+years in the future weren't even remotely on their minds. It's been thru at least one rebuild in its life.
          Jon
          Last edited by TJT; 06-10-2020, 01:24 AM.

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            #6
            No doubt a smart move, functionality and practicality come before the guns being pretty as far as the military goes. And hey, the receiver is the heart of the gun and carries all the history. So, I am not bummed out at all. I wanted a Garand, and I got one. Probably gonna send it to Deans Gun Restoration to have it parkerized and also see if they can get the furniture a bit more color matched. It is still very much my favorite firearm in my collection and even if it was rebuilt, I still own a piece of American History. More than likely this baby saw action in Korea.

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              #7
              The main butt stock looks to be a birch replacement stock. The grain is not right to be walnut. Birch was used by the gov't for replacement stocks in the 60's when walnut became scarce and expen$ive. My DCM "one per lifetime" M1 had walnut uppers and a birch stock. It looked a LOT like yours. Yes, I still have it.
              Jon

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                #8
                Yeaaaaah, well... Still gonna get a matching stock and get it re-parkerized by DGR. I still want a second Garand to make into a tanker copy, if i can find a stripped receiver.

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                  #9
                  Actually there's no such animal as a "Tanker" Garand. Its proper nomenclature is T26. They were never intended for tank crews. It was an airborne trial. My late father was in the south pacific theater in the 503rd PIR in WWII and was part of the original test platoon and had one.
                  Jon

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                    #10
                    I am very much aware, but I think a shorter Garand in .308 would be neat and I want one.

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