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This Could Happen to You!

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    This Could Happen to You!

    Many thanks to Mr. Billy Pyle from The Garand Stand Report for allowing me to use this photo here.
    Not for use without the expressed written permission of Mr. Pyle himself.
    Attached Files
    Welcome to the Addiction!

    #2
    Your photo did not download ? I would guess it might be the 42K rifle that fired out of battery because of a broken piece of the round firing pin being lodged in the bolt firing pin hole ?

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    • Jersey Devil
      Jersey Devil commented
      Editing a comment
      If you click on the attachment you should be able to open the file as a PDF. It's the cover of The Garand Stand Report, Summer 1994, No. 15.
      Please let me know if it doesn't open for you.
      Thanks!

    #3
    this might be easier. I'll try to post a couple of the photos from the pdf.
    Best,Bruce




    Bruce Herrmann
    "Life would be infinitely happier if we could only be born at the age of eighty and gradually approach eighteen."
    Mark Twain

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    • Jersey Devil
      Jersey Devil commented
      Editing a comment
      Bruce,
      Thanks for this!!!
      You rock.
      ----Brian

    #4
    I have seen people, on several occasions over the years in competition, especially during the rapid stage, have a "misfire" on the line, rapidly eject the misfire, let the next round slam into the chamber, never looking at the ejected round and pull the trigger. Problem with that? 1) While immediately ejecting that round, it could go off in your face as it leaves the chamber, 2) Assuming a misfireand and not looking at the ejected round means not knowing whether the primer fired and pushed the bullet into the barrel creating an obstruction doing what is pictured in this thread. (Note: during rapids, while wearing ear protection, it's very doubtful you would hear or know the primer fired). There are correct methods and procedures on dealing with misfires and squib rounds that, for safey's sake, must be followed....GOOGLE it. Ending up with multiple saved rounds and losing any chance for a medal in competition is far better than losing part of your face or your eyesight or that of a range mate.
    Last edited by lapriester; 12-23-2016, 05:50 PM.

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