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    Opinions wanted

    I recently purchased a Garand from a classic arms dealer who was exhibiting at a local gun show. After some discussion, the seller agreed to let me disassemble the rifle and take down all of the serial numbers stamped on the various parts. The barrel stamp / production date is December of 1944. When I investigated all of the other serial numbers, they predated the rifle production date which lead me to believe that the rifle was all original as the sellers claimed it to be. I conducted two days of online research and all of the numbers and stamps on the rifle seem to put forth the notion that the rifle was built in December of 1944 and is all or mostly original as the seller claimed. He stated that he and his father bought a batch of the rifles back in the late 1960's. He claimed that when his batch of rifles were purchased, they were all still packed in the cosmoline and had never been fired other than the test firing that may have been done after production. I spent a few days researching his claims and the rifle, and again, to the best of my knowledge, he was truthful in his claims. The rifle is in immaculate condition. Literally looks like the day it was produced. I have disassembled it three or four times to look at the wear and tear on the parts. It doesn't look like it has been fired but maybe a few times. So, here is my question. Would firing the weapon take away from its value? I would think the value of the weapon would be more firmly based on if it is a legitimate 1944 version with matching parts. But if I start firing it, do I take away anything from the weapon? Frankly, I bought it as a collectors item to pass to further generations. I never had any intent on firing it. But would it matter? Open to any thoughts or advice. Thanks in advance!!

    #2
    OK, the numbers stamped on parts are drawing number and heat lot numbers. A lot would depend on how much earlier the component parts are, and how many are how much older. Also parts, stocks and rifles get refinished. It takes work and experience to evaluate a rifle that is potentially original. It's not possible for anyone to offer an opinion with any value from a written description. Lets see some pictures: the heel of the receiver, the right side of the receiver showing the front leg, the barrel markings, the stock cartouche, the rear sight assembly, the gas cylinder, the op rod w/ markings, a shot of the trigger guard area of the stock showing the front of the grip as well, anything else stamped on the stock other than the one circle P and the cartouche, the right and left sides of the trigger housing, the top of the bolt, the breech surface of the barrel, the barrel pad and I'm sure that I left out a few. If you post as many of those that you can, we'll try to help you out.

    ‚ÄčI think firing valuable rifles is a personal decision. If they really are new, new (very few are) I personally would not fire mine, but someone else might. People sometimes fire gas trap rifles that are worth $30K and risk breaking springs or a gas cylinder that is worth thousands, just because they want to shoot their gas trap. It's up to you.

    If you can't establish that it is unfired except for proofing, fire away! They can take it.

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      #3
      It is a tool and designed to be used--i.e. fired, and LOTS.
      I seriously doubt it is "brand new, unfired". Shoot it and enjoy.
      Jon

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        #4
        List the drawing number and serial number here. Also what about the unmarked parts, have you researched to see if they are correct for the rifle? Is the stock stamped? Pull back the op rod , exactly what is stamped there? Is there anything stamped on the barrel besides inthis area? Post some pics here of the rifle and we will give you a opinion on what you actually have.

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