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Well-maintained and greased Garand difficult to load

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    Well-maintained and greased Garand difficult to load

    It takes an excess of pressure to press a loaded clip into this rifle to load it, far more than any other I've worked with. The rifle is properly greased throughout, including the clip latch. There are no "high" rounds in the clip. What mechanical problem would cause this? What parts should I consider replacing?
    The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
    The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

    #2
    This is a long shot, but I had a similar problem once and found that using old WW2 clips did the trick. The newer AEC3's I was using were a pain, even after I smoothed them down a bit with 0000 steel wool. I'm sure you're already familiar with that, but just throwing it out there.

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      #3
      I assume you also greased the internal receiver rails the enbloc slides on as well?

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        #4
        I greased everything inside the rifle and on the outside, same as I do for other rifles I've owned or worked on. None were this hard to load. I'm using surplus military M2 ball on military clips, that was issued 30 years ago at DCM matches. I used my handloads in competition and and accumulated the issued ammo.
        Last edited by Smokey; 04-30-2022, 11:00 AM.
        The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
        The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

        Comment


          #5
          I have a few things to try:

          From this website: M1 Garand Troubleshooting (m1-garand-rifle.com)M1 Garand Troubleshooting (m1-garand-rifle.com)
          Operating
          Stage
          Malfunction Probable Cause Remedy
          Loading Cartridge clip inserts only with difficulty. Deformed cartridge clip. Replace the clip.
          Broken clip ejector. Replace the clip ejector.
          Interference between bullet guide and follower arm. Replace the faulty part.
          ​​​​​​​From: Troubleshooting new CMP M1 Garand (milsurps.com)

          41. Clip Inserts with Difficulty
          If difficulty is encountered in inserting a loaded clip in the receiver of a rifle which has previously been loaded without apparent difficulty, it may be assumed to be caused by a deformed clip which should be discarded. However, if continued trouble is encountered in inserting loaded clips, it may be caused by one or more of the following reasons:
          a. POINT OF CLIP EJECTOR TOO LONG
          If the offset point of the clip ejector is too long, it may scrape against the side of the magazine aperture in the stock, thereby making it difficult to depress the clip ejector. Disassemble the barrel and receiver group and trigger housing group from the stock, then reassemble the two groups together without the stock. Note the position of the offset point of the clip ejector in regard to the outside face of the magazine of the receiver. If it protrudes beyond this face, the point of the clip ejector is too long. Remove the clip ejector from the trigger housing group in accordance with FM 23-5 and grind the offset point until sufficient clearance is obtained.
          b. BURRS IN MAGAZINES.
          With the trigger housing group removed from the receiver and the bolt retracted, examine the magazine for burrs. Burrs in the follower and slideways will prevent the follower and slide from functioning, thereby making it difficult to insert a loaded clip. Remove burrs with a fine-grained sharpening stone.
          c. INTERFERENCE BETWEEN BULLET GUIDE AND FOLLOWER ARM.
          Remove the barrel and receiver group from the stock and retract the bolt. With the right hand holding against the operating handle so that the bolt does not release, depress the follower and slide several times with the left hand and observe if interference is encountered between the bullet guide and follower arm. This interference is often caused by the opening in the bullet guide being "squeezed in" thereby causing the follower arm or follower rod to drag on the bullet guide. Remove the bullet guide from the receiver in accordance with FM 23-5 and with a suitable wedge spread the opening until suitable clearance is obtained between the bullet guide and follower arm.
          The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
          The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

          Comment


            #6
            Turns out this was the problem:
            " . . . interference is encountered between the bullet guide and follower arm"
            There was considerable drag on the follower arm against one side of the slot, and the Parkerizing was rubbed off on both parts at the areas of interference.
            I used two large flat-blade screwdrivers to open the slot, then reassembled the rifle. The follower now can be pressed down far more easily with no discernable drag.

            I got this rifle in 1987 at a fair price. Guess the original owner was dissatisfied by the difficult loading; and it shot high, even with the rear sight bottomed. I built up the front sight with J&B weld to fix that. This is a postwar mixmaster with a barrel dated 3-48 that's like new.
            The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
            The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

            Comment

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