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    Stock question

    I was wondering if anyone could give me some insight into the stock that my first M1 came with (I have since replaced this stock with a Dupage walnut stock, but am keeping this one as a "back up" of sorts).

    This stock is noticeably lighter than the walnut. I also think it was likely heavily sanded because the finish of the wood seems uneven. The only mark on the stock is a very light "P" firing proof in the ordinary spot. This stock is super chunky compared to the Dupage stock (especially on where the back of the receive sits before the sliding down into the pistol grip area). I am in the process of applying raw linseed oil coats to it (since god knows when the last time anyone oiled the stock was).

    My questions:

    (1) Is this likely a USGI stock, even though there are no stamp markings? This stock has been on the rifle since at least the late 80s/early 90s (when the person from whom I bought the rifle acquired it).

    (2) Any insight as to the type of wood? I have attached a close up of the grain on the rear of the stock.

    (3) My M1 has an HRA receiver - my rifle is a mixmaster, so I am not overly concerned with it being perfect, but I wonder: Would an HRA Garand tend to have a chunkier stock (being later)?

    Thanks for the help! I apologize if any of those questions are stupid, I am still new to the Garand world!
    Attached Files

    #2
    It looks like a birch stock set to me. If so, it’s very likely a usgi set because birch stocks were replacement sets and didn’t have any markings other than the P proof either on the bottom of the grip or on the inside of the grip. An uneven look to the finish is perfectly normal on birch sets. They tend to look amazingly beautiful when oiled properly.
    Welcome to the Addiction!

    Comment


    • lapriester
      lapriester commented
      Editing a comment
      Actually many post war 60's SA rebuild replacement Birch stocks had both circle P (both serif and non) and DAS cartouche stampings. I have an IHC rebuilt by SA in 65 that wears a heavily tiger striped Birch stock with a non serife circle P proof and a DAS cartouche. I got it in unfired condition (not counting proof fire) and it still retained Walnut handguards which, after much searching, I changed to Birch. The stock was fat but not overly so and that rifle, with it's accurate 11-65 SA barrel, is my JCG match rifle.

    #3
    Originally posted by Jersey Devil View Post
    It looks like a birch stock set to me. If so, it’s very likely a usgi set because birch stocks were replacement sets and didn’t have any markings other than the P proof either on the bottom of the grip or on the inside of the grip. An uneven look to the finish is perfectly normal on birch sets. They tend to look amazingly beautiful when oiled properly.
    Oh well that's good to know, and explains why it looks different than the Dupage Walnut stock. I am using the Garand Gear raw linseed oil set and instructions. It seems like it calls for a coat a day for a few days, then a coat like a week later, then allowing it to cure for a month or so. Any other oiling tips I should be aware of?

    Comment


      #4
      Raw linseed oil takes a lot longer time to dry versus boiled linseed oil (BLO). You can read the differences here and decide which linseed oil would be better. Most use BLO.

      https://woodcritique.com/blog/raw-li...d-linseed-oil/
      Looking for SA bayonets 922033 & 1045220

      Comment


        #5
        I've used raw linseed on my stocks. It does dry slowly, so it penetrates deeply into the wood. Stocks that I've impregnated with raw linseed oil kept their zero through drastic changes in climate. Going from hot, humid summers to subzero dry cold.
        The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
        The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

        Comment


          #6
          Is there a reason why later stocks became fat and chunky? Was there a performance reason (i.e., more durable) or was it a question of time/expense needed to make the stock?

          Comment


            #7
            I suspect it's to make them less likely to break in use, while bashing someone's head in for instance. My DCM had a stock so oversize, I couldn't access the trigger properly. Someday I might take a rasp and remove the half-inch or more needed to get it to a more usable size.


            An old GI told me that in close quarters, the butt is more dangerous then the bayonet.
            The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
            The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

            Comment


              #8
              Originally posted by Smokey View Post
              I've used raw linseed on my stocks. It does dry slowly, so it penetrates deeply into the wood. Stocks that I've impregnated with raw linseed oil kept their zero through drastic changes in climate. Going from hot, humid summers to subzero dry cold.
              Also, when RLO oxidizes as it dries, it creates that desired red hue in the stock typical of most originals. BLO and Tung do not. Plus you have to use BLO correctly. Put on heavy and allow it to dry without wiping off excess in 15 min or so and you'll have a sticky mess you'll have strip back off and start over. If you can. BLO contains unwanted drying agents and other chemicals that RLO does not. Using RLO is a patience intense process rhat needs a warmer drying area or a lot of time otherwise.

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