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    Reloading Question for Garand

    I am new to the Garand forum. Pretty experienced shooter and reloader primarily for handgun loads. I've got a Garand on order which will hopefully be here by Christmas. So, I need to start collecting components for reloading I have a Dillon 550 and need advice on dies, powder, primers and projectiles. Plus, any formulae that have worked for experienced reloaders in 30-06.
    Thanks in advance for any help & advice!

    #2
    Originally posted by Wenatchee Kid View Post
    I am new to the Garand forum. Pretty experienced shooter and reloader primarily for handgun loads. I've got a Garand on order which will hopefully be here by Christmas. So, I need to start collecting components for reloading I have a Dillon 550 and need advice on dies, powder, primers and projectiles. Plus, any formulae that have worked for experienced reloaders in 30-06.
    Thanks in advance for any help & advice!
    A properly maintained Garand is easy to load for. I use RCBS dies, a 150 grain Hornady spire point, 40 to 45 grain of H4895 powder, (39 to 44 grain H4320) will work. Extraction should be between 1 and 2 oclock looking over the sights. Start low and see how the loads go. I use CCI large rifle primers.

    I've been loading for over 50 years and I've had very good success with 165, 173 and 180 grain projectiles. Powders IMO no faster than 4064 and no slower than 4320 unless you're real experienced.

    I recommend extruded powders as the moderate loads of the Garand have lower case density and ball powders can be IMO to low a case density unless you're running near a maximum load.

    Comment


    • Venom6
      Venom6 commented
      Editing a comment
      Mr. Milisock has given you sound advice. The rifle was designed to shoot the military load of the time which utilized the non-canister equivalent of 4895 powder. Many an op rod has been broken or bent by using slower powders which are perfectly appropriate in a bolt-action '06. Many load manuals don't mention this; some (such as Hornady) have separate sections on loading for the Garand. Though loading components of all kinds are in short supply, it is worth some effort to locate CCI34 primers, which are mil-spec; a number of documented M1 "blow-ups" have been traced to "soft" primers. The reasons are more complicated than space and time here allow (and I have no wish to get into any arguments). Many thousands of rounds using standard primers have been fired from Garands without incident, but these fine old rifles are to be treasured and treated with the respect of careful loading.

    #3
    I prefer a ball powder in a 550 as stick powders tend to crunch and you might get over/under charge weights. I have used BL-c-2 many years and love it. 4895 is another fav. I shoot military 147/150 pull downs as they are/were cheap range fodder. Any large rifle primer will do (I’ve used them all) though some guys prefer CCI. My brass is once fired GI so i have to swage the primer pocket. You will need a three die set plus the powder drop for the 550, Carbide not necessary. If your only loading a few then Imperial lube is your friend, otherwise every one has a different opinion as what lube to use. I suggest a press light (led) if you don’t already have one.
    With that said, i have not loaded a commercial powder in some time. I have a supply of unknown surplus powder which I did ladder test using USGI bullets and ported gas plug. Thus I can keep my cost down to around $0.10 to $0.12 a round. Also, i purchased my primers and bullets around 2005. Good luck.

    Comment


      #4
      Rifle "blow ups" because of an incorrect primer is bunk. I've been reloading for the M1 rifle for 45 years and shooting competitively as well and have used every primer you're likely to encounter. The "secret" to priming is to make damn sure you have no "high" primers. At the very least they need to be flush with the bottom of the case. Ideally, about .005" below flush. Primer seating depth is 1000% more important than who's primer you use.
      The 40 grain starting point with H4895 sounds a little light--I don't have my charts in front of me. Use tested, published data from a known, reputable source. Too light of a powder charge is just as detrimental to the machinery and operating personnel as a too large charge. A too small charge is a perfect set up for a "detonation" instead of the required "controlled burn" of a proper charge. In essence, the detonation is an explosion (like black powder) rather than a burn. Just sayin'.....
      Small-base resizing dies are absolutely NOT required for loading for the M1 rifle.
      Jon
      Last edited by TJT; 11-11-2021, 03:01 AM.

      Comment


        #5
        Thanks guys for your input. Looking forward to getting the components----and the Garand from CMP!

        Comment


          #6
          Significant air space in the case will result in shifts in the impact point on the target, depending on how the propellant settles in the case when the primer ignites. I also used a ball powder and had to shift aim depending on whether I was single loading, it was the first round from a clip, or it was slammed in in normal cycling.
          The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
          The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

          Comment


            #7
            Originally posted by Smokey View Post
            Significant air space in the case will result in shifts in the impact point on the target, depending on how the propellant settles in the case when the primer ignites. I also used a ball powder and had to shift aim depending on whether I was single loading, it was the first round from a clip, or it was slammed in in normal cycling.
            The case capacity issue is why I used extruded powders for my rifle. I settled for an about 80% load as my light load.

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