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question about using iron sights on the M1

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    question about using iron sights on the M1

    Hi everyone

    I got my world war 2 era M1 a few weeks ago so Ive taken out to the range twice now.

    Ive never shot a rifle with iron sights before so its been an adjustment. The very first time I shot the M1 was at a range where the target was 100 yards away. Needless to say I could hardly see anything so I didnt stay long because Id be wasting ammo. Yesterday I went to a range with the targets at 25 yards. I shot pretty well with it so I am happy but I need to improve. Are there any tips anyone can give me or any resources anyone can suggest I read to help me shoot better? Thanks a lot.

    Phil

    #2
    If my memory serves me correctly, the Garand will shoot 2MOA high a 100 yards. The info you seek will be in the post above or over on one of the other Garand sites. Someone has likely posted a military PM on zeroing and shooting the Garand irons sight.

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      #3
      Since you never used iron sights before, make sure you are focusing on the front sight and not the target

      http://www.odcmp.org/0907/default.as...U_SIGHTPICTURE
      Last edited by jak; 04-25-2021, 05:54 PM.
      Looking for SA bayonets 922033 & 1045220

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        #4
        Front sight in SHARP focus. The target and rear aperture will be fuzzy.
        Jon
        Last edited by TJT; 04-27-2021, 02:36 AM.

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          #5
          Shooting iron sights is an acquired skill. Everyone has a method of training and in my experiance a medium contrast target can be assembled inexpensively. I use a brown cardboard backer and cheap 9" white paper plates.

          Start at a close range where you can make hits. As said before concentrate on the front sight. I use a 6 o'clock hold and adjust for a center hit. You can move to longer ranges as you improve. I regularly shoot this combination at 200 yards and occasionally at 300 yards.
          Last edited by David Milisock; 04-27-2021, 06:36 AM.

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            #6
            Normally, in competition, I shot best with a 6'oclock hold. I have the elevation knob set so the group is right at the tip of the front sight at 100 yards, with the 100 yard setting. The "battle" setting (around 275 yards) puts the hits into the center of the bull with a 6'oclock hold. I actually use my Garand "in the field" and prefer it to hit right at point of aim for that purpose.
            The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
            The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

            Comment


              #7
              Proper target also is a must . Search online for SR-1 tagets. You can print them off free

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Smokey View Post
                Normally, in competition, I shot best with a 6'oclock hold. I have the elevation knob set so the group is right at the tip of the front sight at 100 yards, with the 100 yard setting. The "battle" setting (around 275 yards) puts the hits into the center of the bull with a 6'oclock hold. I actually use my Garand "in the field" and prefer it to hit right at point of aim for that purpose.
                I prefer the intended target to appear on top of the front blade. A 6 o'clock hold on a 9" paper for a center hit places the 300 yard hold on top of the plate. A 200 yard center zero has a 300 yard hold 3 to 4 inches over the top of a 9" plate, then you can't see the plate.

                In the field for me the 6 o'clock hold method keeps the live moving target above the front blade even out to 400 yards.

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                  #9
                  Generally I'm working with less than 100 yards to whatever I need/intend to shoot on the property. If I'm shooting further, I change to an appropriate elevation setting. Since bear and the like generally don't have an aiming spot, I align the sights on the desired impact point.
                  The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
                  The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

                  Comment

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