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What parts are unique to the 7.62 variant?

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    What parts are unique to the 7.62 variant?

    Can some one tell me or point me to a list of the unique parts on the .308? Other than the barrel, I can't seem to find a good answer on this.

    Thanks

    #2
    The answer is basically none. During the barreling process the issued rifles went through rebuild and parts that were out of spec were replaced. More often than not, probably with new late parts. But, any of them could have retained many original parts from the pile of original in spec parts removed before the barrel changes or barrel sleeving. The ones designated as award or competition models were probably built up using NOS or new late parts.

    Can you tell an "original" Navy Garand by the parts it has on it alonem I don't see that as possible. There are records of the receivers that were converted and the ones used for award and comp rifles but that's about it.

    I have a 7.62 NATO barreled Navy receiver I built to a complete rifle using in the wrap and NOS parts throughout. I could easily claim it was a complete rifle when I got it and it would be hard to argue it wasn't. Except for the pretty Boyd's laminated stock on it that is, LOL.

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      #3
      OK. There is one shop that sorts parts as either M1 Garand parts or T2 Garand (308) parts. I guess it's just their way to showcase the parts.

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        #4
        I read a lot about that last summer and came across two accounts that claimed that the spacer blocks improved the feeding of .308 cartridges. (https://www.fulton-armory.com/spacerblockf308cal.aspx). I believe the airforce used plastic spacer blocks in the 1960s for their .308 Garands in order to prevent Soldiers from inserting 30-06 cartridges and theoretically having an out-of-battery slam fire when trying to chamber a round.

        Otherwise, the only other part that is particular to a .308 Garand is the barrel. I have seen some marketing claims for .308 or NATO M1 stocks, but I can't find any informational sources on them. I believe their being labeled as .308 or NATO parts is erroneous.

        Berreta made M1s on Winchester tooling in both 30-06 and 7.62. Bloke on the Range has some videos on them. I believe his is a Dutch contract weapon and I know I have seen Malaysian contract weapons before. Parts made by Berreta may be labeled as .308 or NATO. I can't speak to their interchangeability with American-made weapons.

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          #5
          Originally posted by KY Rifleman View Post
          I read a lot about that last summer and came across two accounts that claimed that the spacer blocks improved the feeding of .308 cartridges. (https://www.fulton-armory.com/spacerblockf308cal.aspx). I believe the airforce used plastic spacer blocks in the 1960s for their .308 Garands in order to prevent Soldiers from inserting 30-06 cartridges and theoretically having an out-of-battery slam fire when trying to chamber a round.

          Otherwise, the only other part that is particular to a .308 Garand is the barrel. I have seen some marketing claims for .308 or NATO M1 stocks, but I can't find any informational sources on them. I believe their being labeled as .308 or NATO parts is erroneous.

          Berreta made M1s on Winchester tooling in both 30-06 and 7.62. Bloke on the Range has some videos on them. I believe his is a Dutch contract weapon and I know I have seen Malaysian contract weapons before. Parts made by Berreta may be labeled as .308 or NATO. I can't speak to their interchangeability with American-made weapons.
          Thanks for these details. Here in Canada we have a lot of he Berreta and Breda Garands and Garand receivers. Would be interesting to know why it is that way here. Probably more to do with USA importation laws restricting the import of these Italian made guns rather than anything particular about Canada. Kind of like SKS rifles (we have tons of Russian and Chinese SKS coming in all the time).

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            #6
            For the most part KY Rifleman is correct, but Beretta inspected and condemned the production machinery provided to Winchester by the War Department which was stored outside in the weather for a few years in violation of contracted terms, IOW - "rode hard, and put away wet". Beretta elected to build their own machinery instead. They probably were still using the Pratt & Whitney machines they purchased around 1930 for their other arms.

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              #7
              The US Navy used a white plastic spacer that attaches to the bullet guide on their 7.62 Nato M1 Garands. This was done not to improve feeding but to prevent the loading of a clip of 30-06. In the mid 1960s M14 rifles were in short supply and the US Navy needed a rifle in 7.62 Nato for ship board use. They were used for shooting mines and shore patrol. So the Navy had existing M1 Garands converted to 7.62 Nato. The Navy also developed a MN M1 Garand in 7.62 Nato. The Navy NM 7.62 Nato M1 Garands held their own against US Army NM M14s in competition. At the same time frame the US Air force competed with their version of a NM M1 Garand in 7.62 Nato. Both SA and RIA made M1 Garand barrels in 7.62 Nato in the mid 1960s.

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                #8
                Restricting this old thread. Trying to find a USGI spec stock in Canada can be tricky because there are so many 'T2' Garand stocks floating around that are 1/2" short. Can someone confirm if the USGI length is 29 1/2"?

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                  #9
                  I Will be home next week and I can measure the stock then. If no one answers sooner.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Andronicus View Post
                    Can someone confirm if the USGI length is 29 1/2"?
                    Yes, the USGI stock is 29.5 inches in length.
                    Jon

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                      #11
                      Probably a result of shortening the barrel for the shorter cartridge. They shortened the buttstock and rear handguard instead of the forward handguard, and the op-rod would also have to be shortened.
                      The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
                      The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

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