Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New Owner

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    New Owner

    I normally collect Colt Revolvers so this is new ground for me. I was at an auction recently and a M1 in the CMP hard case box came through and I brought it. I hope you guys can help me figure out what I brought. It is marked serial number 1321499 Winchester on the receiver. The bolt is marked 6528287-SA A11. The stock is marked CMP in a box. I have not attempted to open up the action as I am not at all familiar with this rifle. Any information you can give me will be appreciated.

    #2
    You have a rifle that has been through at least 1 rebuild program. We call them "mixmasters" in the collecting world. The bolt is from Springfield Armory, hence the SA. The #'s preceeding the SA are drawing, or part number. The A11 is the material lot number. Remember this, there is only one serial number on an M1 rifle. All other numbers are drawing numbers and revision numbers.
    To start the disassembly process, pull the bolt back to cock the hammer. While holding the operating rod handle securely, depress the follower until the bolt unlocks from the locked position. You'll hear a click when it unlocks. Use the handle and ride the bolt forward until it is fully in battery. Now, turn the rifle upside down on your bench, table, or lap. Grab the rear of the trigger guard and pull it rearward and up away from the trigger plate. It may come easily, or you may have to work it a bit. It should be tight as it is in a new stock. After you get the guard opened, the trigger assembly should slide right out. Now, hold the rifle by the front hand guard and smack the comb of the stock upwards to dislodge the receiver from the stock. If the receiver is tight in the stock, you may have to bang the heel of the stock (i.e. the top of the butt plate) on your work bench to dislodge it. Once loose, the receiver will rotate downward from the joint where the butt stock and front hand guard meet together. From there, watch a you tube video, or read an article on how to detail strip, inspect, lube (with grease, not oil) and reassemble the rifle. It's not rocket science, but too involved to write here. Oh, and for lubing, ANY automotive wheel bearing grease is sufficient. No need for ANY "magical" or expen$ive "special" gun grease, unless you enjoy spending $$ needlessly.
    Hope this helps you out some. Have fun, enjoy your new toy, and welcome to the addiction. Keep us posted. We're here to help.
    Jon
    ps. Pull the op rod to the rear, and tell us what the markings are on the barrel behind the op rod. That will help us ascertain whether or not the barrel MAY be original to the receiver--always a bonus if it is, or may be.
    Last edited by TJT; 11-12-2020, 03:17 AM.

    Comment


      #3
      With the OP rod pulled back you should be able to see what barrel it is. Most likely SA with the month and year made. If it's winchester(but not likely)there will be a small circle with a w inside. Usually difficult to see.
      Something like 3-SA-8-51 etc. Many other parts to identify. You can check the OP rod too but must remove the stock to do so.

      Comment


        #4
        Brownell's has a set of 4or5 videos on youtube showing breakdown and cleaning of the M1. Very helpful. Get some 30.06 snap caps and load a clip to practice loading/unloading the Garand.

        Comment


          #5
          Thank you for the information. Do you know what era the serial number on the receiver would date to?

          Comment


            #6
            It looks like a April 1943 manufacture.

            Comment


              #7
              you can also contact CMP & with 25 dollars /with serial number , they will verify you with letter it came from them and month/year it was sold .

              Comment


                #8
                Here's another good info page on Garand lubrication. Be sure to grease every location shown.
                http://www.garandgear.com/m1-garand-grease
                While they us a specific brand, literally any automotive chassis grease will work fine. The worst thing you can do is use it ungreased.
                The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
                The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I saw a reference to it being unsafe to use modern .30.06 ammo. What is the recommended ammo to use in the M!?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    You can buy US M2 rounds at places like Ammogarand or you can buy new manufacture from companies like S&B, Hornady and Federal. Only use ammo that states its loaded for M1 Garand to prevent damage to the rifle. Most bullets I've seen are 150-168gr.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Pretty much any 30-'06 of no more than 180 grain bullet weight and loaded to SAAMI specs (i.e. "industry standards") will be safe in the M1 rifle.
                      Jon

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Another Garand owner, Schaft I don’t think he is on this forum, retired senior Army master Sgt. claims he owns a total matching M-1 perfect in every way, not Springfield,International Harvester. Okay boys we all know and a few members on this forum feel that’s impossible, because Springfield supplied parts to that company. And his barrel is Korean vintage date. It has to have been rebuilt, at some time in its life. I played along, don’t get me wrong its a fine piece, the stock has . cartushes, I am not an expert by any means, I just read on this forum, I’ve known a few older vets, thru the Confederate Air-force. I am trying to make a deal on a X CMP Springfield, I understand If you buy from CMP, you are not suppose to sell it for a year! Is that right? I’ve been on the CMP Facebook, very confusing, about there hours of operation, it’s a 16 hour drive for me to. Talladega. Going to see how this works out.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X