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  • M1 Garand Checked Off Bucket List

    Good evening y’all. I’m a new member and new owner of a prized M1 Garand. Last Friday I picked up a Springfield manufactured in 1944 (3,22x,xxx) with some mixed other gun company parts *note* this rifle came CMP. Over the next few months I want to restore it with SA 1944 parts. I really didn’t know if I needed to post this in “Gunsmithing Armorer Duties” or in the “M1 Garand general discussion”.
    I purchased a complete bolt assembly D28287-19SA heat lot O-16. After my purchase, I missed a major detail, this bolt was removed from service due to bad heat treatment. I can’t return it and I will DEFINITELY WON’T be installing it. Do I just have a wasted bolt assembly now or what? Did I waste my money?
    -OR-
    Since this rifle came from CMP, should I just leave it completely alone and not change parts? Thoughts?
    I guess I wanted to post this in general discussion to get as many replies as possible.
    Any info would greatly appreciated concerning this bolt.
    Last edited by Gros_Bec; 08-06-2019, 10:15 PM.

  • #2
    "If" barrel is not correct I wouldn't waste time or money restoring. What vendor sold you a recalled bolt and wont let you return it??? You do know you need to check headspace when changing bolts?

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    • #3
      +1 on what Orlando said. Actually you should check headspace on any garand you purchase, whether it's from CMP or another seller. FYI. the last garand I purchased from CMP failed headspace miserably. If the seller won't let you return the bolt, you can dispute it with the credit card company. If you paid cash at a gun show, yea, you are out of luck. However, there are some people who would probably want an O-16 bolt just for being unique.

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      • #4
        Thank you for the response. Yeah I got the bolt off eBay (I know), the seller didn’t allow returns. I didn’t put a lot of money into it, but money is money you know. I could probably resell it. I read over something about head space the other day, but I didn’t go down that rabbit hole when I probably should have. Where do I need to go to to look for that info or do I need to go see a reputable gunsmith concerning head space?

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        • #5
          It will be cheaper to have a 'smith check the head space than to buy the gages to DIY. Also, as always, Bill (Orlando) is spot-on.
          Jon

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          • #6
            What's the date on the barrel? Pull back the op rod and tell us how it's marked on the side of the barrel. If it's an SA barrel it will be marked S A. (#) (##), the # being the month and the ## is the year.
            one thing to remember--the ONLY serial number is on the receiver heel. ALL other numbers are drawing, or part numbers so don't get caught up in the "the numbers don't match" game.
            Jon

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            • #7
              It’s “ SA 11 44”. Also before the SA is a number 3 stamped in a different font size. Then a “W” by itself back towards the bolt.

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              • #8
                Your barrel was manufactured in November of 1944. Your receiver 3.22 million was manufactured in October of 1944. Just because your receiver was made in October does not mean it was built into a rifle in October so it is very possible that the barrel is original to the rifle.

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                • #9
                  Any guesses on the brass emblem and painted numbers?

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                  • #10
                    Rack/inventory numbers.
                    Jon

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                    • #11
                      Thank y’all for the all the help and in site. I’m hoping to get to the range soon!

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                      • #12
                        Before you hit the range do a detail strip of the rifle and make sure it's properly lubed. M1's don't like to run "dry". Also, make sure the front sight screw and gas cylinder screw are TIGHT! You don't want the groups wandering or the rfle "short stroking". Make sure the ammo is M1 Garand specific. Don't just go to Wally World or Big 5 and buy the cheapest ammo you can find. Standard hunting loads CAN cause op rod damage. If you roll your own ammo, again, use M1 specific data.
                        Jon

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