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Should I restore/replace the stock?

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    Should I restore/replace the stock?

    Hello All,
    I have owned my Winchester M1 Garand for 15 years or more and have been wondering if I should do anything with the stock? The stock is in great condition and is as it was rec'd from CMP. It has numerous markings on it - and the wood has a dark patina. If I remove the markings, will I damage the value? Will a new stock be a better way to go if I decide to go that route?
    Also, I saw some posts about valuing a M1 and they talked about whether the internals were original or not. Will all the internal parts be marked with 'Winchester' or some other manufacturer's name? I haven't disassembled it to look for them but want to know what to look for if I feel justified at disassembling it at all (a big IF).

    Thanks!
    Larry

    #2
    BTW, forgot to mention the number "42" is at the base of the pistol grip - what would that indicate? There's also the letter "P' embossed into the wood behind the trigger guard. What does that indicate? I should have asked this first, but is there a place I can go to find info about all the markings on a Garand?

    TIA,
    Larry

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      #3
      The only thing to do to the stock is clean the surface dirt and grime off of it. Mineral spirits and/ or boiled linseed oil are good for cleaning. The "42" is probably a rack or inventory number. The "P" is an inspection stamp notating that the rifle was "proof fired" for safety. What other marks are on the stock? Try to be as exact and explicit as possible. Pics help a LOT.
      Internal parts will not be marked "winchester". SOME may have a "WRA", but most will just have a drawing, or part number on them. Pics are the best way to identify parts. Each manufacturer's parts are slightly different from the others and as you gain proficiency in parts id'ing you'll be able to tell the difference. By the way, that education takes YEARS to acquire--not a night or two on the nets. Also, there is ONLY ONE serial number on an M1 rifle--the number on the receiver heel below the maker's name. ALL other numbers on parts are drawing, or part numbers.
      Jon
      Last edited by TJT; 07-18-2019, 12:30 PM.

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        #4
        Thanks, Jon. Much appreciated. Not sure I want to start the learning experience of identifying the internal parts. I'm nearing 70 and don't shoot the M1 much any more so it's an investment sitting in my gun cab. But I'd like to protect the markings on the stock (your comments helped that decision very much) so I'll concentrate on that and let a buyer decide how much disassembly needs be done to identify parts markings. But I will definitely clean the stock per your suggestions...
        I will search for any other markings and post some pics.
        Thanks again!

        Comment


          #5
          You will need to post clear detailed pictures. Internals are not marked besides op rod

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            #6
            Applying linseed oil or tung oil were normal maintenance for the wood. I use raw linseed oil, it dries slower and penetrates deeper.
            The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
            The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

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