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Op Rod Jumping the track

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    Op Rod Jumping the track

    I recently purchased my first M1 Garand. I fired the rifle for the first time today, it hasnt been fired in many years, during the first clip the op rod jumped the rail twice but after this it cycled fine without issue. Any idea what could be causing this or what to look for? Or could the gun just needed to "warm up" after not being fired for a long, long time.

    #2
    Out of spec (read that as under-sized or plain worn) op rod tab, or receiver track, or both are the likely culprits. If it's the tab, Columbus Machining can repair it. If the receiver track is worn, you're pretty much SOL. There's no such thing as op rod "warm up". Maybe there was a piece of old dried grease that got knocked loose. Time will tell. Good luck.
    Jon
    Last edited by TJT; 05-10-2019, 09:45 PM.

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      #3
      +1 to TJT, start with measuring the op rod tab to see if it is in spec. I believe the normal acceptable operating range is between .095 to .100 in thickness. If I am wrong someone please post up the correct spec as I am an M14 guy and just primarily the police around here.
      But if it is less than .095 it would be recommended to be remachined back to thickness and possibly back to height/width specs on the tab as well.
      m14brian

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        #4
        Often the problem you experienced is a simple as improperly pulling back on the op rod. If you lift upward slightly when retracting it, it can become partially dismounted even though the rifle closed to battery, seemingly correctly. Then when you fire the rifle it fully dismounts. Did this happen both times on the first round fired? If so, I'll wager the above was the problem. It's not ALWAYS a worn tab and you definately wouldn't be the first to do the above.

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          #5
          What kind of ammo were you using? If "hot" commercial, or hunting ammo is used, it could have dire consequences as well. The gas system in the M1 rifle is designed to operate between certain parameters and if those parameters are exceeded, damage to the rifle is possible. Use only M2 Ball spec ammo or commercial ammo that is specifically loaded for the M1 rifle. Your best ammo would be home-rolled as you have complete control over the components and charge and projectile weights.
          Jon

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            #6
            Originally posted by TJT View Post
            Out of spec (read that as under-sized or plain worn) op rod tab, or receiver track, or both are the likely culprits. If it's the tab, Columbus Machining can repair it. If the receiver track is worn, you're pretty much SOL. There's no such thing as op rod "warm up". Maybe there was a piece of old dried grease that got knocked loose. Time will tell. Good luck.
            Jon
            Columbus Machine can remedy even a worn track by enlarging the tab and fitting it to the receiver.

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              #7
              Thanks Larry. I wasn't aware of that service.
              Jon

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                #8
                It was one the first two initial rounds but would function fine after that, though I did have one failure to eject and one that got stove piped. I was shooting 150gr prvi ammo that mimics the m2 ball. I'll just have to shoot a few more rounds and see. The op rod looks squared without any rounded edges where it goes into the channel on the receiver. I'll have to get out my micrometers and take a look.

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                  #9
                  Have you greased and oiled all the requisite areas? If not, that's a good place to start.
                  Jon

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                    #10
                    I'll do that the next time before I shoot it. I'll take it all down. Any other recommendations?

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Easternhunter338 View Post
                      I'll do that the next time before I shoot it. I'll take it all down. Any other recommendations?
                      Are you saying you didn't properly and completely lubricate your rifle prior to shooting it before your original post and question? If not, I'm surprised you didn't have multiple malfunctions and failures. One of the most important things you absolutely must do before shooting a Garand is that. It's a good possibility your op rod dismount problem was directly caused by lack of lubricatoon. You're very lucky you didn't or haven't done some sort of damage in the process to the receiver or op rod. Dismounts can cause some pretty significant damage to either or both.

                      And BTW, properly lubricating involves using high viscosity grease as well good gun oil. Using only oil in certain places is almost as bad as nothing at all.

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                        #12
                        2 things:
                        ​​​​​​1) to the M1 rifle, grease is grease, is grease. Any bearing grease you have laying around will be fine, and
                        2) don't over-grease it. It will spit the excess out and it will be all over your glasses and face.
                        ​​​​Don't over-think the lubing. No need for ANY special, hi-tech or tactical grease. The rule of thumb is, if it slides, grease it. If it rotates, oil it.
                        Keep us posted.
                        Jon

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                          #13
                          One other thing--if you're shooting from a bench with a rest, make sure the front rest is under the main stock and not the front hand guard.
                          Don't limp-wrist it when shooting it. Conversely, you don't need to hold it with a white-knuckle grip either. Just hold it firmly.
                          Jon
                          Last edited by TJT; 05-14-2019, 11:31 PM.

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                            #14
                            As to where to grease a Garand, this is a good reference:
                            http://www.garandgear.com/m1-garand-grease
                            And the advice as to what grease to use is good from the previous responses above. Any good automotive grease will be fine.
                            The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
                            The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

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                              #15
                              Thanks for all the info everyone, I tore apart the rifle yesterday and everything seems to be okay and there was previous grease on the rifle but it most certainly needed more. I didn't get to mic the op rod channel but it appears nicely squared off with no noticable issues. I think it may have been operator error when I nudged the op rod when putting in the first round.

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