Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1943 springfield

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    1943 springfield

    Hello guys, new to the forum. I'm looking to buy a 1943 Springfield but it has a Winchester trigger group and bolt. Any knowledge as to why this would occur and other things to watch out for. Price is set at $800. Is this a good deal? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
    Attached Files

    #2
    For me, I like to make sure the barrel matches the receiver. You have a mid war rifle. Parts are easier the get than gas traps or early gas port rifles. I also like to make sure the rifle has the correct stock as well or a good ww2 stock that I can sell off for the correct one. 800.00 is a pretty good price for just about any Garand as long as the barrel isn't shot out. I also like to make sure the rifle has original finish. Of not for me, I will pass. I want originality. I can always repark anything, since I do restorations on machine guns
    also again ww2 barrels for mis war rifles can be found as well. You will need somebody to be able to index and re-install the replacement barrel, which I can do
    take care and good luck
    have fun

    Comment


      #3
      Rifle is a mixture of parts, its common. Nothing to worry about

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks for all the information. I'll have to see if the barrel matches and other things. I just want a ww2 era rifle for nostalgia purposes and I've always wanted a garand since I was a kid. What would a gun like this go for? I was told it was a cmp rifle and the throat errosion is 1.5 and the muzzle is at 3. Any idea on the going price of these guns?

        Comment


          #5
          It appears to be a rebuild but looks to be a mix of WWII parts so far (which is cool in itself as it helps date the era of the rebuild). Not sure what inof you have at hand but you at least got to a date for the serial number (and we will worry about which books to get after you have simmered on Garands for a little while longer). Pull the receiver group out of the stock and look at the right side receiver leg; rebuilds will often be electro-penciled there with an abbreviation for a location and a date.

          For a restoration candidate, Gunheep is on track but pull back the oprod and look for a barrel date in among what is stamped there. For this one you would be looking for a date that generally matches the title of your OP - 1943. These can be off by several months so yours could be from late '42 to maybe spring of '43 to be in the 'correct' range but if it is a rebuild then anything could be there, which kind of turns it into a cool shooter candidate. WWII rebuilds will often be found with original finish, too.

          But for a shooter you are looking more at the barrel and specifically the muzzle. I will assume you have inspected a bore before so do your thing there but for a crispy Garand barrel, well they are a thing of beauty and look something like this;



          Bad ones are obvious and can look like this sewer pipe (this barrel was the worst I have ever seen at both ends. It came on my first Garand!);



          Many sellers will already have these barrel readings for you but if you know anyone with a Garand TE gauge (for throat erosion) then make use of it. New is a 2 (though they can be lower) but 5 is still ok if you have a good muzzle. Many guys have also gotten the newer muzzle erosion gauge. In theory, the tighter the muzzle, ... but again, you probably know that. Some barrels will gauge a 1 or less at the muzzle but a 3 is generally considered to be shot out.

          Lower is better on both ends, but the proof is in the pudding and there is a lot that goes into making these rifles tack-drivers - some really nice barrels are all over and some pretty worn barrels are still darned impressive.

          Of course if you get a barrel that is correct for that serial number then you have really scored something cool - the better the barrel the more amazing it is (and near new ones do exist, though they are pretty uncommon). But then you will have to decide if you are going to try to tackle a restoration of a very doable era and bring it back to its original configuration, and maybe look for another Garand to be your shooter, ... (what???, ... you all did it too).



          or not, ...

          Either way, we are here to help and we will not get you in trouble with your significant other at all.

          Heck it looks like you might have an SA WWII stock on there but I couldn't tell which cartouche that was.

          So, to answer the original question; if that has a good barrel then 800.00 doesn't sound bad to me nowadays. Shoot or restore, it looks better than the one I started on, ...

          Sorry, just felt like typing this morning - hope this helps.

          Comment


            #6
            Took me too long to type.

            Go to the CMP site and look at what a muzzle of 3 grades out as and that is your price.

            http://thecmp.org/cmp_sales/rifle_sales/m1-garand/

            Lots of guys would go to the stores and look for the nicest rack grades (TE of 3 or more) and try to make a few hundred on them. If you are near one of the stores then go yourself - you can hand pick your own first rifle from racks of them. Or go for a little better grade or look for a matching barrel, or, ...

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Easternhunter338 View Post
              What would a gun like this go for? I was told it was a cmp rifle and the throat errosion is 1.5 and the muzzle is at 3. Any idea on the going price of these guns?
              $800 is a fair price

              Comment


                #8
                As for the "mixmaster" condition of depot rebuilds:
                https://www.americanrifleman.org/art...rand-rebuilds/
                The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
                The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I got these pictures as well if they help identify the rifle. I'm not sure if this helps or what it signifies? Any ideas and does it change the value? Thanks everyone!
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                    #10
                    As I said earlier, it is worth the asking price

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Any idea what these markings mean on the rifle or what they signify?
                      Attached Files

                      Comment


                        #12
                        The first photo is the drawing and revision number for the reciever, as well as the heat lot code. The third photo on the right looks like the remnants of a SA GAW and ordnance wheel cartouche. George A. Woody was an inspector at the Springfield Armory during the war.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Oh okay excellent, would that drawing and revision number be consistent with the serial number on the rear of the receiver in the previous pictures above? And any way I could tell more about the gun? Every piece I've seen so far appears to be from WW2, the whole trigger assembly, the Winchester barrel, bolt, trigger guard, stock and all but the rear site with is stamped "ihc" on the right side. Did someone try to assemble a gun with WW2 parts or was this a 1940's re-arsenal or a field job? Thank you?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            According to my resources, that's the right revision for your serial number. I would guess its assembled, the IHC part definitely didnt come from the 1940s. I would suspect any rebuild would be marked as such in some way on the stock if it was from the 40s. I have a rifle that came with a mix of WW2 parts and a RIA FK rebuild cartouche over the original SA NFR cartouche. I see many others with marking somewhere on the stock from that era of rebuilds.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by IndianaRR View Post
                              According to my resources, that's the right revision for your serial number. I would guess its assembled, the IHC part definitely didnt come from the 1940s. I would suspect any rebuild would be marked as such in some way on the stock if it was from the 40s. I have a rifle that came with a mix of WW2 parts and a RIA FK rebuild cartouche over the original SA NFR cartouche. I see many others with marking somewhere on the stock from that era of rebuilds.
                              Many have only a proof stamp on the pistol grip. Generally not circled. If it's a Greek return it may have no markings at all.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X