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Estate Sale Garand - What do I Have Here?

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    Estate Sale Garand - What do I Have Here?

    Hello,

    New guy here! Just picked up an M1 from an estate sale!! I would be very interested in what you think of it. I disassembled it for cleaning and parts identification. Here are the details that I have found so far:

    It is a Springfield - Serial number 3992XX (Nov. of 1941).

    No import marks anywhere.

    It has a LMR 1954 dated barrel (not familiar to me). Bore is bright and bullet/muzzle test looks good (don't know how to check for chamber erosion).

    It has an IHC bolt. The rest of the parts that are marked with dwg numbers are all correct for SA 1941/42. I'm not sure how to tell the correctness of the un-marked parts.

    The op-rod is un-cut - does not have the stress relief cut.

    The gas cylinder was very tight. Gas plug is the early non-valve type.

    Unfortunately, the stock was was expertly sportorized. It is full length with all metal except for the butt plate.

    Looks like it has the original M1907 sling. Very dark with age.

    The finish on the metal parts is parkarized a vey dark gray - looks original to me - but not sure. There was some very light surface rust on the barrel around the gas cylinder.


    Questions I have for you:

    How do I determine if the gas cylinder is correct - as well as other un marked parts?

    Can I shoot commercial ammo with a non-vented gas plug and non cut op-rod.

    Was this rifle worth the $800 I paid?

    I am fairly new to Garands, but did try to do some research. Please let me know if there is anything I need to check before I fire it and any other information you can share.

    Thanks!
    werra

    #2
    Parts are a mixed lot so you have either a rebuilt rifle or a rifle that was commercially assembled . Possibly someone also started a restoration since it has some early parts. If barrel is not worn out $800 is not out of line.

    Comment


      #3
      LMR replacement barrel. Rifle was rebuilt some time in its life. LMR barrels were used by IHC-they didn't make their barrels. Some LMR's were used by HRA. LMR barrels were the best of the best. Match rifle builders used them whenever they could. If the barrel is in good shape, it should be an excellent shooter. DO NOT use any commercial 30-06 ammo in your rifle unless it is M1 specific. No harm will come to the gas plug but the op rod stands a good chance of being irrepairably damaged. Hand loading is the best way to go with the M1 rifle. Barring that, get an adjustable gas plug if commercial ammo is all you have or have access to. I've never needed an adjustable gas plug in 40 years, but I've been reloading for that same 40 years (and then a few more).
      Jon

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks for the replies! Good to know it is a good barrel!! Bore looks great and M2 ball bullet test is about 1/8". Not sure how good that is.

        Do you think the un-cut op rod will be ok to shoot with M1 specific ammo? Or should I replace it?

        Comment


          #5
          Uncut op-rods seem to be pretty common, and I haven't heard of problems being reported in all the forums I frequent. I say use your rifle as is, especially if it's an ordinance rework "mixmaster". Those were required to be fit for issue to combat infantrymen. Don't bother with "correcting" it, in years to come it may well be more valuable as is.
          The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
          The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Smokey View Post
            Uncut op-rods seem to be pretty common, and I haven't heard of problems being reported in all the forums I frequent. I say use your rifle as is, especially if it's an ordinance rework "mixmaster". Those were required to be fit for issue to combat infantrymen. Don't bother with "correcting" it, in years to come it may well be more valuable as is.
            Glad I don't have to worry about the op-rod - they are not cheap!

            Since the original stock was sporterized, I ordered a new stock from Dupage. Not planning on replacing any other parts unless they are necessary or for safety.

            Comment


              #7
              One of my M1 rifles has an un-cut op rod. I'm not the least bit concerned about it.. It works fine. Remember this--WWII was won with millions of un-cut op rods.
              Jon

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by TJT View Post
                One of my M1 rifles has an un-cut op rod. I'm not the least bit concerned about it.. It works fine. Remember this--WWII was won with millions of un-cut op rods.
                Jon
                That is a very good point!

                Comment


                  #9
                  This rifle does not have any electro pencled arsenal rebuild markings on the receiver leg. Is that of any significance?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Your uncut op rod is at least 75 yrs old and unknown how many cycles it endured. Yes WWII was fought with M1 Garands with uncut op rods but it was war. In the post war rebuild program the op rods were modified. All post war made op rods were made with a larger relief cut than the post war modified op rods. If the op rod fails there is a great chance it will strike you in the face. There are always collectors looking for uncut op rods. You could mostly likely be able to trade your op rod for a NM op rod.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by werra View Post
                      This rifle does not have any electro pencled arsenal rebuild markings on the receiver leg. Is that of any significance?
                      Only 1960's rebuilds had etched receiver legs

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Orlando View Post

                        Only 1960's rebuilds had etched receiver legs
                        Good to know- Thanks!!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by RDS View Post
                          . If the op rod fails there is a great chance it will strike you in the face.
                          Another "wives tale". There are no recorded instances of the shooter being injured by an op rod breaking.
                          MAYBE if you're a lefty, as mineself, but a rightey--the op rod would just fall off your outboard side of the rifle. Had this been a problem in actual combat usage, the problem would've been rectified long before the post-war modifications.
                          Jon

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