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Cardboard Liners for En Bloc Clips

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    Cardboard Liners for En Bloc Clips

    New member with a question that's probably been asked before...were the cardboard liners for en bloc clips used just in ammo boxes and bandoleers, or were they actually used in the M-1910/M-1923 cartridge belt pouches to protect the ammo? It would seem that the cardboard would quickly deteriorate and become a soggy mess if used in the cartridge belt pouches during rainy weather or in tropical jungle conditions. I have a M-1923 belt to go along with my 1942 Springfield M1, and I wanted to load the pouches correctly with 8-rd clips but didn't know if the liners were used routinely or not. Thanks.

    #2
    The cardboard liners for the en bloc clips are not used in the cartridge belts. You should be able to locate 1942 dated 30M2 ball or AP (AP would be better) plus you can still find leather slings dated 1942 and maybe a bayonet too. How complete is your 1942 rifle ?

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      #3
      I bought it from a dealer at a local gun show a few years ago, but it is a CMP rifle with all the accoutrements and certification. It is a nearly complete 1942 Springfield (Service Grade), 886500, except re-barreled in 1947. I do have a repro leather sling, and will be looking for a M1905 bayonet (16") and M3 scabbard (which I believe are correct for a '42). I almost bought an M1905 last year for a good price ($100), but it was stamped USN and I was really looking for either an Army or USMC bayonet. In hind sight, I should have picked it up for that price.

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        #4
        Photos of a June 1942 M1 with a May '42 barrel, sling is Boyt 42, stock is short channel with faint SA GHS. Type 1 lock bar is difficult to locate.

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          #5
          Imagine, in the heat of battle, having to remember to ditch the cardboard before reloading an empty rifle? You want as few obstacles as possible between reloads.Can you imagine trying to load the rifle with the cardboard on your ammo? A few seconds could be the difference between life or death.
          Jon

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            #6
            Also many collectors think all revision 12 bolts are the same but there is an exception. The early revision 12 bolts that replaced the revision 2 bolts in early 1942, still retained the hole all the way through the right bolt locking lug (just like the revision 2 bolts) The heat lot code on my early revision 12 bolt is RE5B which has the hole all the way through the right lug.

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