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6 O' Clock Hold at Various Distances

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    6 O' Clock Hold at Various Distances

    Good evening everyone. I had a question in regards to zeroing the Garand using the 6 o' clock hold method. I have zeroed mine so that the POI is approximately 3 inches above the POA at 100yds on a 6 inch target. Assuming that the elevation drum is calibrated and I use the same load each time, does the POI remain 3 inches above the POA at say 200yds? Or does the POI double to 6 inches above POA because 1 MOA is approximately 2 inches at 200 yds versus 1 inch at 100 yds. Or at 500 yds is it now 15 inches above POA or still the 3 inches it was at 100 yds? Forgive me as this is a real brain buster for a simpleton such as myself. Also, if I was wanting to change between 6 o' clock hold and a center hold I would essentially just lower the elevation 3 MOA correct? Cheers!

    #2
    Forget using the drum elevation. The Garand isn't a match grade rifle but a rifle designed to hit man sized targets. I never calibrate any of the drums on my garands. I count the clicks up at various ranges , write it down and keep in range bag. You can also keep a piece of paper with clicks written down and store in holes under butt plate
    2 more clicks up will get you on paper at 200, adjust from there

    Comment


    • TheB00T8930
      TheB00T8930 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you very much. I guess the drum didn't even need to be mentioned in my original post. I was more curious if the 3 inches high I am hitting at 100 yds would remain constant no matter the distance. Or if because it is 3 MOA it would change to 6 inches at 200 yds, 9 inches at 300 yds and so on.

    #3
    For competition I shoot better scores with a 6'oclock hold. I almost exclusively use mine in the woods now and set the sights so the group is sitting on top of the front sight at 100 yards. I set the elevation drum for 100 yards with that. The "battle sight" setting seems to work then with the 6'oclock hold on the bull for regulation paper targets. Your rifle will probably be different. Note that point of impact will vary anyway with ammunition, temperatures and time of the year if the wood isn't well sealed.
    The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
    The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

    Comment


    • TheB00T8930
      TheB00T8930 commented
      Editing a comment
      I appreciate your insight! Its amazing that there are so many variables that change the POI. Until I started longer distances in the last year or so I had no idea it was such a science.

    #4
    You have to put bullet drop into the equation as well, don't forget.
    Jon

    Comment


    • TheB00T8930
      TheB00T8930 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you Jon. Doesn't adjusting the elevation drum account for the bullet drop? That would still cause the POI to be 3 MOA above POA or am I completely wrong with that?

    #5
    The e-drum is a rough guesstimate at best. They are not exact. They were designed for hitting a man-sze target, not driving tacks. Each and every rifle is different just as two consecutive cars off the assembly line. As identical as they are, they're as dfferent as night and day. Just adust your e-drum until it prints where you want it to at a given distance, notate where the e-drum is in relation to the yardage mark and learn to live with it. I have 4 M1's. None of them shoot the same. They're all different. They're all sighted for 100 yards on the drum. After that, it's a crap shoot. Count the clicks up and maybe add a little Kentucky Windage as/if necessary. You're wanting/chasing a unicorn.
    Jon

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      #6
      The drum was designed and marked for rough aiming with, at the time, issued Ball ammo. And the only requirement was that it enabled you to hit a man sized target at the various ranges marked on the drum.

      Comment


        #7
        As noted, the ammunition changed as well while the rifle was in use.
        It may originally have had the sights set up for the M1 Ball with the 175 grain FMJBT. Then M2 Ball became standard with the 152gr FMJFB. Apparently the black tip armor piercing ball became standard issue as WWII continued. The sights, if calibrated for one of these, would not have worked for the others at longer ranges.
        The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
        The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

        Comment


          #8
          If you're using 6 O'clock hold at 100 and you adjust your sights as you normally would do for 200, 300 etc, you would use a 6 O'clock hold at that distance as well.

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