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    Cleaning question

    Hello All, I just received my 1st M1 from CMP. Field Grade, Springfield Armory, 426XXXX making it a post war ('52-'54). Couple of dings in the stock and a small crack in the upper hand guard just in front of the receiver. Tonight will begin the field strip and cleaning and lubing, but my question is about the stock. My intention with this rifle is to shoot it. The ME is 3 and TE is 4 so I am not expecting a tack driver. Since it is going to be a shooter I want to clean the stocks up some, but not do a refinish. What are some of the best products to remove almost 70 years of palm sweat from the stocks? I assume there is already a thread on here somewhere that has great detail on best practices for cleaning but I wasn't able to locate it with a cursory search. Additionally, is there a preference or more importantly, an absolutely do not use grease that I should be looking at? I use grease on my shotguns and pistols, so I have some but would like to hear of any preferences for the old war horse. Thanks for any assistance, and I understand that the M1 has a way of cloning and multiplying in ones safe!! Hope the wife buys that story.

    #2
    Murphy's Wood Oil Soap.

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      #3
      Originally posted by Zorba View Post
      Murphy's Wood Oil Soap.
      This will work but copious amounts of Mineral Spirits wipe over a couple of days will also clean it up followed by treatments of Boiled Linseed or Raw Linseed oil. If you use BLO, apply, rub in well then wipe off any excess in about 15-20 minutes. BLO will turn into a sticky mess it applied heavily and allowed to dry without wiping off the excess. RLO can be left on much longer since it takes much longer to dry. Days in fact. RLO will also oxidize faster and produce that reddish tone folks desire.

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        #4
        Don't over-think the grease. To an M1 rifle, grease is grease, is grease. Hi-temp, hi- pressure wheel bearing grease will be fine. No need for ANY expensive, or "Miracle" grease of any kind. Get a 1# tub at your local Walmart for $5-6. It will last you 100 life times.
        As to the myth of M1's multiplying-unfortunately, it's true.
        Jon

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          #5
          Thank for the advice

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            #6
            If it slides, grease it; if it rotates, oil it

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              #7
              Automotive chassis grease does an excellent job. If that's what you have, go ahead and use it. Don't get paranoid about the amount either. A little extra just gets pushed out of the way, and may get pulled back in later. Grease every moving surface. I often completely disassemble the rifle first, and coat every surface with grease to prevent rust later. A good oil works for the trigger group. LSA is excellent, but motor oils is fine if that's what you have.
              I got a tub of Mobil 1 synthetic grease a while back through Amazon. The LSA you can probably also get through Amazon.
              ABSOLUTELY NEVER USE A GARAND DRY.

              For the wood I use raw linseed oil. It dries slowly and soaks in deep, helping stabilize the wood. It does take a while, with daily applications going for a week or more until it stops soaking in. I read somewhere that the military used Tung oil on the stocks until it started getting scarce; then they changed to raw linseed oil.
              Last edited by Smokey; 09-06-2018, 08:47 AM.
              The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
              The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

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                #8
                Originally posted by Smokey View Post
                .... I read somewhere that the military used Tung oil on the stocks until it started getting scarce; then they changed to raw linseed oil.
                You are right. According to Scott Duff, Springfield changed from raw linseed oil to tung oil (China oil) in 1941 because the linseed oil 'had a tendency to smoke and sweat during prolonged periods of firing'. He goes on to say that at some point in 1943 the supply of tung oil dried up and they substituted a 'synthetic' material, but did not know what that material was.

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                  #9
                  Those little tubs of grease that can be stashed in the buttstock with the cleaning kit originally had Lubriplate in them. Great hi temp grease that resists corrosion.
                  They used that stuff on amphibious aircraft landing gear wheel bearings and even salt water wouldn't eat up the bearings or races. Normal gob type grease would fail to resist corrosion.
                  You want the 630-AA type or even the 130-A (which was the original type).
                  https://www.lubriplate.com/Products/...30-Series.html
                  https://www.lubriplate.com/Products/...30-Series.aspx
                  https://www.ammogarand.com/m1-garand...-wwii1130.html
                  Some auto parts stores still carry it, but you used to be able to find it in a 1# can at Western Auto stores. Not sure if Advanced Auto Parts (direct lineage to Western Auto) carries it today.
                  There was another chain that carried it no too long ago, but I can't recall the name of the chain. The 10oz tube should last a long time though. Try contacting Lubriplate at the site above and see if you can find someone in your area who carries the 1# can or if they will sell it directly. (I don't see it as a choice on their page.)

                  The later dark coloured grease you can find in those same little tubs was some sort of molybdenum based grease. They changed to that during Korea and when the M14 was in play.
                  Numrich carries the moly grease in the little tubs. https://www.gunpartscorp.com/products/409550

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