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    M1 indentification question

    Hey guys.
    I am a new member to the forums and would like to thank you beforehand for viewing my first post. I am a 28 year old Canadian who recently acquired my firearms license. I had been trolling various classified ads and gun forums up here for an M1 Garand for probably a year before I went through the process of getting a license. I spent many hours watching videos and researching what to look for when buying an M1 and some of the specifics in how to date a gun and how to read it’s markings. Finally, during the largest gun show in Canada I found what I believed to be a gem of an M1. Out of probably 5000 guns at the show I came across 6 M1’s with the poorest being 1600$ and unfireable due to a bent operating rod. M1’s demand quite a premium here due to importation costs and limited supply.
    When I saw this gun it was one of those moments in life where I knew there was no way I was going home without it. I had saved up and knew that a good gun meant big money. This was also my first firearm purchase and (legally) owned gun. I’ve since shot about 250 rounds and really enjoy the experience of becoming proficient. It’s also been a motivator to get in shape, not the easiest gun to shoot.
    Before I saw this gun I knew I wanted a nice quality shooter. What I was told is this particular gun could be considered a collector grade, whatever that means. I was told it has most likely seen combat in WW2 and Korea, but how that could be verified I don’t know. The stock has only two stamps which I found confusing. As far as I could tell the receiver was manufactured in July of 1944 and it was rebarreled in 1951. As for the validity of the claim of this being a collector grade I was wondering if members of this forum could help verify that this is indeed a matching parts gun or if I was mislead and paid too high of a price.
    The bigger question I have is should I feel bad about shooting this gun regularly and risk devaluing it if I do?
    my first idea was to buy a criterion barrel and switch it out, leaving the possibility of switching it back to retain the guns value if the need arises, which I cannot foresee. I hope the attached photos are enough to give an idea of what I have. If you have any questions let me know. Thanks again for reading this rant and your time.
    -Ben.

    #2

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      #3
      Congrats on getting your Garand!
      m14brian

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        #4
        Welcome to the forum. Unless you have documented paperwork or an actual picture, it is almost impossible to verify where or when a rifle has been. Your rifle
        has been somewhere and been used otherwise it would not have had the barrel and other parts replaced. The parts are not matching. In 1944 a Springfield garand would not have Winchester parts install. To me a collector grade ganand would have all the original parts and stock. That being said, shoot the rifle with the 1951 barrel, you are not hurting anything.
        The "P" in a circle is a firing proof when the rifle was first manufactured. The "SA" in a the box is the rebuild stamp. The painted 704 is a rack number to help identify the rifle among all the other rifles in a rifle rack.
        As for the price.......I realize that the prices are a lot higher in Canada. In the USA, it is way too much.

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          #5
          Here in the US we would never call that a Collector Grade rifle. Its a mixture of parts and has no "extra" value. I am no way knocking your rifle, it looks nice and should make you a great shooter. Do not worry about wearing it out, as long as parts are now in spec, keep it properly greased, cleaned and with a good op rod spring and it will outlast you
          Congrats

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            #6
            Thanks for the replies guys. I am more relieved than disappointed. It is a nice gun and I will enjoy it more now without that hanging over my head. I paid 2500$, I know that will make a lot of people here probably choke but it is what it is. Of the dozen or so M1’s I’ve looked into up here it was by far the nicest.
            In theory, how many rounds would have to be put through a barrel before it was “shot out” they claimed it has excellent bore and I ordered the tool to measure it.

            also, one of the windage knobs does not move in one direction on the sight. Is this a common problem that’s easily fixed?
            thanks again
            -Ben

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              #7
              Nice rifle. As far as the windage knob try backing off the center screw in the windage knob. Try one counter clock wise click at a time. You must hold the knob firmly as you loosen the screw.

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                #8
                Don't worry about measuring the barrel proof is how it actually shoots. You are worrying to much, just go out and shoot it

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                  #9
                  Thanks for the replies. I intend to

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