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M1 Garand short barrel

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    M1 Garand short barrel

    I bought an M1B Garand short barrel. It has a Springfield Armory receiver numbe of 2016784. I field stripped it and it’s not a welded receiver which is good. The barrel and gas rod were shortened but it’s looks professionally done. I would bet that receiver could be from the original Springfield Armory and modified.

    My my question does anyone have any idea what ammo is b3st for this rifle? I’ve heard some slow burning rounds might not be good for gas port.I am not an ammo expert so some help is needed.

    thanks. Gary.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Ordnance72; 02-02-2018, 10:10 PM. Reason: And yes the rifle is laying on a railroad track. Its my garden railroad bench. Just an FYI

    #2
    Hi Gary
    What caliber 30-06 or 7.62 Nato?

    Comment


    • Ordnance72
      Ordnance72 commented
      Editing a comment
      RDS. It’s 30-06

    #3
    Gary try US mil surplus if you can find it. Lake City (LC) from the 1960 or 70s is very good. If not Federal 150gr FMJ box marked for "M1 Garand". Prvi also makes 150gr FMJ for the M1 Garand.
    Do not use commercial hunting ammo it can damage the op rod. Stick with mil spec ammo.

    Comment


      #4
      Thanks RDS. I’ll look for that kind.

      Comment


        #5
        Boy, it feels good to be and be a Garand owner again. I drilled in many Ohio State University Pershing Rifles Drill team competitions with an M1.
        i sold a Korean War Garand and have kiced myself in the ass ever since.

        Comment


          #6
          Pardon my ignorance but what is an M1B? That rifle you have is modeled after the T26 variant. Just for the record, my late father had one of the T26's in the Philippines in WW II. It's discussed elsewhere in these forums.
          It is a USGI Springfield receiver. The receivers were not modified.
          Jon
          Last edited by TJT; 02-04-2018, 12:13 PM.

          Comment


            #7
            Kind of looks like one of those "Tanker" Garands that was made up from full sized ones by an importer. The job they did was very good, so for a long time, people thought they were an issued variant. Springfield Armory apparently made some relatively recently based on the T-26 if they aren't still. There's a specific listing in the Blue Book under Springfield Armory regarding that.
            I can't recall the importer who made theirs up though. There was an article in Guns & Ammo, American Rifleman, or another publication that showed a photo of the ad they had in magazines back in the day and they talked aboot how that came to be.

            Comment


              #8
              There are a lot of so called Tankers floating around made by various companies, some not very well done and don't function faithfully. The Blue Book listing you reference would be the commercial Springfield Armory Inc not to be confused with the original Springfield Armory

              Comment


                #9
                MRusan,
                "Tanker" and "T26" are the same thing. Yes, they were a very real variant in the SWPA in WWII, albeit in an extremely limited number. My late father was in the 503rd PIR in the SWPA and actually had one. I remember him telling me about it when I was in my teens and early 20's (Dad passed away in '79).
                BTW--I'd still like to know, what is an "M1B"?
                Jon
                Last edited by TJT; 10-14-2018, 06:53 PM.

                Comment


                  #10
                  In the past 30yrs or so I know of (3) companies that marketed so called M1 " Tankers",
                  Springfield Armory Inc, (SAI) built ones on new commercial receivers.
                  Federal Ordnance built some on M1 Garands they imported from the Philippines.
                  Arlington Ordnance built some on M1 Garands they imported from Korea.
                  Gun Parts Corp. sold kits to convert a standard M1 to a so called "Tanker".
                  There was other so called "Tankers" built in the 1960s on welded receivers. Most were built by companies in Cal. that went out of business many years ago. One of these firms coined the phrase M1 "Tanker"

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