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    New Stock Problem

    I just finished a new walnut stock for a CMP M1 Garand. It looks great but the trigger guard will not close. I'll post a picture as soon as I solve this problem.

    #2
    A bmf rubber mallet is your friend. Don't remove any wood if it can be avoided. A tight fit is desireable.
    Jon

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      #3
      Did the wood swell up a bit after the refinish? Just curious.

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        #4
        DO NOT start trimming wood. Was it closed when you got it? Then it will close now. New wood compresses over time and all you will accomplish by making it close easier is making it too loose when it does. Also, once you get it closed, LEAVE IT CLOSED for a couple of months to allow the receiver to compress the wood and bed itself. You do not have to field strip the rifle for normal cleaning and you shouldn't.

        Here is how they closed them when originally assembled. Grease the trigger guard lugs, close it as far as you can and give it a hard smack with a rubber mallet in a slightly rearward direction. It will close, don't be shy with it. Then leave it closed for a few range sessions.

        Last edited by lapriester; 05-15-2017, 04:29 AM.

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          #5
          Lapriester's advice was perfect. The second hit got it. What a wonderful picture he included. Well, here it is with a great tung oil finish, walnut, and almost new hardware. I'm ready for the range.
          Last edited by Fourbits; 05-16-2017, 06:24 PM.

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            #6
            Very nice rifle. Stock looks great, glad I could help. Just remember to give that wood a chance to compress and the receiver to settle in. Every time you take the stock off, especially before it settles, it takes 8-10 shots forvthe reciever to return to it's sweet spot and accuracy to return. On my match rifle I take the stock off once, maybe twice a year. In between I clean the barrel, refresh the grease where I can and pull back the op rod, pull the gas plug and lightly swab the gas cylinder. Even that cleaning is only done after each 3-4 matches.

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              #7
              I'm new to this forum. I was on a M1 Carbine forum until I got the M1 Carbine almost done. I am now picking up a M1 Garand S.N. 39,XXX. It looks to be from late April, 1940. I won't have for a few more weeks so I really can't check all the part numbers. But so far it is looking good. But the stock I am questioning because I don't see any cartouches. I believe with that S.N. it should be S.A. S.P.G. Do you think I should look for another stock for it? Thanks, joe48

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                #8
                Are you looking for a collector or shooter? If there's nothing wrong with your current stock and it has a tight lock up, you're good to go for a shooter. If you're looking for collector grade, get ready to mortgage the house and give up your first born male child. Did I mention it will be expen$ive?
                Jon

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                  #9
                  Congratulations on your pick up. First you need to start a new thread in the pre wwii section as you will find more people to answer your question. Second if your rifle is "looking good" and most of the pieces are correct then maybe you should consider looking for a stock. However, before you consider that option, you need to first determine what you have.

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                    #10
                    it will be a long and expensive search. While it is possible, its doubtful that early of a rifle is correct

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by joe48 View Post
                      I'm new to this forum. I was on a M1 Carbine forum until I got the M1 Carbine almost done. I am now picking up a M1 Garand S.N. 39,XXX. It looks to be from late April, 1940. I won't have for a few more weeks so I really can't check all the part numbers. But so far it is looking good. But the stock I am questioning because I don't see any cartouches. I believe with that S.N. it should be S.A. S.P.G. Do you think I should look for another stock for it? Thanks, joe48
                      Even if you find one, which will probably be a long search, it will cost you close to 3/4 what you paid for the rifle. Like Orlando said, trying make a rifle that early correct will be almost impossible and extremely expensive. A shoty pinion rear sight alone will cost you so much it would shock your investment counselor so much he would quit.

                      It's also very doubtfull there will be many correct parts on the rifle when you get it and there's really not much of a premium on receivers that early. I've had 2-3 in that range I bought as bare receivers from CMP or receive on FG or SG rifles purchased.
                      Last edited by lapriester; 05-20-2017, 11:46 AM.

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                        #12
                        Well guys, I guess I will just see what I can do by just refinishing the stock for now. The stock looks like it been through hell and back so it might be the original one. Someone put a thick coat of something on it, looks like they didn't know what they were doing. I was looking at some pictures of it the other day and there might some armory markings? But there are so many dents and scratches I won't be able to tell until I strip it. I don't collect any guns I can't shoot, but I do like to have them as close to original as possible. Thanks for the info. but if I do Op for a new stock who would have some of the best? Thanks Again, Joe

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                          #13
                          I have seen some terrible stocks that cleaned up nicely with a little TLC. Good luck.

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