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Can anyone ID these CMP barrels?

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    Can anyone ID these CMP barrels?

    I just received 2 Service grade M1 Garands from the CMP. I am new to owning any Garands and am trying to learn everything about these two rifles as possible.



    The 1st Garand (713xxx) has a throat reading of 3 and muzzle reading of 1+. Its barrel is reads D3 5448-16 R 92B on top. On the side it reads S-A-10-42 as well as a bunch of other letters pictured below.



    D3 5448-16 R 92B on top


    A possible "A" on top


    S-A-10-42 on side


    A jumble of letters on side

    #2
    PBS is a US rebuild facility overseas, most of the codes are from the pacific area. I think someone has data on these rebuild locations on the CMP Garand forum if you post some photos. Collectors like the PBS stamps on barrels and they are not that common to find

    Comment


      #3
      The lead dipped heel was done when the rifle was originally built, not in '65 during the rebuild.
      Jon

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by TJT View Post
        The lead dipped heel was done when the rifle was originally built, not in '65 during the rebuild.
        Jon
        No, that is not the case at all. No SA or any other M1 came from the factory with a lead dipped heel. They were done later when a defect was discovered in the heat treat process that left some rifles with somewhat, but not dangerous brittle receiver heels.
        Last edited by lapriester; 04-08-2017, 03:19 AM.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by brend2b
          The 2nd Garand's (1159xxx) receiver was lead dipped in 10/65. It has a throat reading of of 2+ and muzzle reading of 1+. Its barrel reads SA 6535448 6 65 BU 19 and P M followed by a small DOD cartouche on the side.



          View of the side


          I was wondering what kind of barrels I have on my rifles and how close they match to the receivers. I was considering giving one of my Garands away as a present in the future and I don't know which one to hold onto myself. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks!
          No M1 receivers were lead dipped during the 60's rebuilds no matter where they were done. Lead dipping was done very early and in the 40's. Mostly to some early SA receivers.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by brend2b

            Thanks for leading me in the right direction. I would post on the CMP forum but the only moderator thathe can approve my new account is away at the CMP Regional Championships until the 10th.



            OK, thanks. I assumed it was in 65 because "LEAD 10/65 was etched/engraved on the receiver. I guess that was just indicating that it was lead dipped because you can barely tell.
            You can barely tell because it was done probably 40 years prior to the 65 rebuild and possibly refinished more than once since it was done. The darkening created by the lead dipping may be faint but it will always show to some degree no matter how many times the receiver is refinished.

            The "LEAD 10/65" etching means it was rebuilt at the Letterkenny rebuild facility in October 1965. LEAD rebuilds are sought after by some.

            Comment


              #7
              Your 713XXX M1 dates to 7-1942 so it's doubtful the 10-42 barrel is original to the receiver since most known original 1942 M1's have barrel dates preceeding the receiver date by about a month. The barrel on your rifle may have been replaced in that PBS facility during an early rebuild or refurb. Early barrels in that condition are highly sought after and it's probably worth at least half, or more, than what you paid for the entire rifle. Only a complete tear down and inspection can determine what, if any, of the other original parts remain on the rifle since it's been rebuilt at least once for certain and maybe more than once.

              The second receiver dates to January 1943 and the barrel was replaced during the 10-65 LEAD rebuild with that 6-65 SA barrel. Note that the 60's SA barrels are some of the best and most accurate barrels ever installed on Garands during rebuild. Rifles with those barrels generally make excellent match grade rifles for CMP competition and LEAD rebuilds were some of the best late rebuilds done.

              Generally, rebuilds of early Garands will be greater mixmasters than later rifles since they may have been rebuilt multiple times and most of the original parts may have been replaced because of wear and use in as many as three wars or even by another country. it does sound like you scored on those rifles, especially when it comes to barrel condition. Both should be excellent shooters.
              Last edited by lapriester; 04-08-2017, 03:18 AM.

              Comment


                #8
                IIRC, your 1.1 mil receiver is within the range of Springfield's factory annealing. Bruce Canfield's latest book has maybe a page on this topic. Great reading, if you're so inclined.

                Edit: Page 358. "...the 'factory annealed' Springfield Armory receivers are thought to be confined to the approximate 1,100,000 to 1,600,000 serial number range..." Canfield also states that Winchester likely did factory annealing in the 1,200,000 serial number range, FWIW.
                Last edited by FlyJS41; 04-08-2017, 09:00 PM.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by FlyJS41 View Post
                  IIRC, your 1.1 mil receiver is within the range of Springfield's factory annealing. Bruce Canfield's latest book has maybe a page on this topic. Great reading, if you're so inclined.

                  Edit: Page 358. "...the 'factory annealed' Springfield Armory receivers are thought to be confined to the approximate 1,100,000 to 1,600,000 serial number range..." Canfield also states that Winchester likely did factory annealing in the 1,200,000 serial number range, FWIW.
                  I stand corrected. This I didn't know. Thanks!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Larry,
                    I accept your apology.
                    Jon

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by lapriester View Post
                      LEAD rebuilds are sought after by some.
                      Yes, me for one! OP - Can you post pics of the overall rifle? I'm curious to see exactly what you received. Look on the bottom of the pistol grip for an orange triangle and a 5/16" x 3/16" proof P on the front of the grip.

                      Click this link to see what I'm talking about:
                      http://s48.photobucket.com/user/dbro...ml?sort=2&o=45
                      Last edited by SFCDave; 04-11-2017, 02:58 AM.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by brend2b
                        The 2nd Garand's (1159xxx) receiver was lead dipped in 10/65. It has a throat reading of of 2+ and muzzle reading of 1+. Its barrel reads SA 6535448 6 65 BU 19 and P M followed by a small DOD cartouche on the side.



                        View of the side


                        I was wondering what kind of barrels I have on my rifles and how close they match to the receivers. I was considering giving one of my Garands away as a present in the future and I don't know which one to hold onto myself. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks!
                        This is a post war replacement barrel, made in 6/65 at Springfield Armory. Should be a good shooter and a even better shooter if it has low erosion numbers.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by SFCDave View Post

                          Yes, me for one! OP - Can you post pics of the overall rifle? I'm curious to see exactly what you received. Look on the bottom of the pistol grip for an orange triangle and a 5/16" x 3/16" proof P on the front of the grip.

                          Click this link to see what I'm talking about:
                          http://s48.photobucket.com/user/dbro...ml?sort=2&o=45
                          Unfortunately, the CMP sent them out with new stocks.

                          Comment


                          • Nibbs
                            Nibbs commented
                            Editing a comment
                            PBS was PENINSULAR BASE STATION and in Italy.
                            OBS would be ORDINANCE BASED STATION and in Australia.
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