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For those with deep pockets............

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    For those with deep pockets............

    Here ya go, defiantly out of my pay scale


    Complete Gas Trap Barrel, Complete Type III Plus REAL Keystone - CMP Forums (thecmp.org)

    #2
    Remember when he was offering serial number 23 (which had been repaired but looked nice) it had a gas trap barrel and

    original springs.

    Comment


    • collectorofww2
      collectorofww2 commented
      Editing a comment
      #23 receiver was mine bought privately in 90-91. i sold it to Tony from Orion. yes the receiver had a cut rail that was nicely repaired but, the rest of the parts were added to build a complete gun. Tony had #23 trigger housing as he told me at the time he picked it up. so what ever BS stories were told about that receiver i have the real story about it. i can tell you who i bought it from, the town, what i paid for it and a picture of me holding it at home.
      Last edited by collectorofww2; 04-09-2022, 12:37 PM.

    #3
    He won't get it. With the purchase of that and any other parts that you may have into it you'll have 60K into the parts rifle. They're not bringing that. Prices are starting to go down. Interests are changing. But this happens from time to time with Garand's and they will go back up. But as of right now he's shooting for the stars.
    not happening

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      #4
      During the past fifteen years or so, I have a few original gas trap barrels sell in the 6K to 10K price range, a full length keystone spring 2K to 4K.

      Original un-altered and not messed with SA SPG stocks are extremely rare, especially the later stocks with two equal sized holes in the butt.

      Comment


        #5
        The price of original gas trap barrels, cylinders, and springs are not going down. They've actually stayed steady and increased a bit.

        You're exactly correct Robert. Unaltered original SPG stocks are extremely rare, especially with a cartouche and extremely expensive. Even harder to find an unaltered original stock with the drawing number that is cartouched.

        The value if these parts are relative by their rarity and their collectibility.

        Comment


          #6
          I have seen the prices stabilize and even decrease slightly. They are not made anymore, they will go back up.

          Comment


            #7
            I can’t see spending $40k on my 40k receiver, but it would be fun. I remember when I was at a small auction near Gettysburg and 3 of them sold for less than 12k. One was fairly complete, one a little less, and the cheapest around $6-7k but had I think a real barrel and many other real parts. I’m sure some on the forum were probably there. I was after an IHC (5-6) which were hard to find when the auction took place 12-15 years ago.

            Comment


              #8
              Originally posted by GUNHEEP View Post
              He won't get it. With the purchase of that and any other parts that you may have into it you'll have 60K into the parts rifle. They're not bringing that. Prices are starting to go down. Interests are changing. But this happens from time to time with Garand's and they will go back up. But as of right now he's shooting for the stars.
              not happening
              I must be looking in the wrong places, but everyplace I see Garands, including most any other firearm, the prices have only been taking a recent price jump.

              Danny

              Comment


                #9
                Too rich for my pocket
                amf1>

                Comment


                  #10
                  Yeah that's for rich guys or the most ultra die hard that has to have one.
                  m14brian

                  Comment


                    #11
                    I think there will be some buyers of the gas trap front end "kits" when Pucci lists them.

                    I have known a few collectors over the years that worked on gas trap restorations, some had every part except for an original barrel, when s/n 2126 surfaced, it was complete except for a stock and trigger housing assembly, the new owner had to settle for a SPG numbered stock that had been converted to trap door. This was reversed back to no trap, do not know what stock is on this rifle now.

                    When s/n 197 surfaced on auction it was without a stock and ended-up with a SPG numbered stock also converted to trap door and then reversed. Problem with s/n 197 is that it had the guide ribs welded for the 7th round correction - which brings about another interesting question concerning gas trap rifles: Are there any original gas trap rifles with corrected welded-up guide ribs ?

                    Comment


                      #12
                      2126 was far from that complete when it was found but did have the original barrel and gas cylinder along with a few other internal pieces. There was a good article awhile back in the Garand Stand Report on it's restoration and several WTB ads in old GCA journals from Bruce Canfield hunting parts for the restoration of 2126. It is an original gas trap rifle but with restoration as it retained it's original barrel and cylinder but it's not 100% original as first assembled by Springfield.

                      The only original gas trap known to date that has surfaced with built up guide ribs is 35,093. It is well documented in test reports. The rifle has been in the Army's possession until it was sent to the CMP a few years ago. Article in GCA Journal, Fall 2017. 35,091 was also listed in the report from Frankford Arsenal as having built up guide ribs and a new type follower assy. (Revision 4 follower) for testing. These rifles, per Campbell's notebook, were assembled in March 1940 from bare receivers that had the ribs welded before assembly and then they were sent to Frankford Arsenal for testing purposes. These are the only two known documented original gas trap rifles with built up guide ribs, at this time. Whereabouts of serial number 35,091 is unknown at this time. Rifle serial number 6,096 was also listed in the reports but was a control rifle and, to my knowledge, did not have welded/repaired ribs.

                      338 was originally thought to have been an original gas trap to gas trap rebuild with welded/repaired ribs a long time ago and was featured in The Gas Trap Garand by Billy Pyle but unfortunately years later it was found out to have been a restoration well after publication of Billy’s book. Had this information been known before hand it would not have been featured as such.

                      If an original gas trap rifle surfaces with built up guide ribs and there is no supporting documentation (such as a military test report or such) in my opinion, it's probably not an original rifle. There are original gas trap rifles with high ribs but the receivers were manufactured with high ribs and not welded/ repaired. My basis or theory upon this thought process is that gas port production started a few months after 35,091 & 35,093 were originally built/assembled and tested. Gas trap parts , ie barrels and cylinders, were being used up in production before and during gas port production as the gas trap design was still deemed servicable/usable. There are receivers that have low guide ribs that were used into gas port production but most receivers at this time were manufactured with high ribs. Production was still very low during this time period and there was no large scale rebuild program in affect as of yet so it would not have been feasible to have large stores of parts set aside for repair or rebuild. Evidence of this was reported by Springfield Armory on rifles repaired/rebuilt in each months fiscal reports. As production increased and more rifles were in need of repair or rebuild then a full scale rebuild program was instituted on a larger scale and it would have been more feasible to have parts on hand to support this program.

                      As some valuable notes, Gas Trap rifles were NEVER RECALLED for rebuild into Gas Port rifles as some stories have been told. They were rebuilt when the parts, ie. barrels/cylinders, became worn out past their service limit. They were then rebuilt/repaired using the newer gas port design barrel and cylinder. Also the low guide rib was not a mistake of manufacturing as it has been told/reported over the years by some. The original blueprints from Springfield Armory show this feature to be purposely manufactured this way. Lastly, the welded guide ribs is not the only thing that was used to fix the seventh round malfunction. Small tolerance changes and part finish were also incorporated during this time also. The seventh round malfunction was the most publicized malfunction of the Garand rifle. Notably during it's production there were other malfunctions but they were not publicized like the seventh round malfunction was and the seventh round malfunction was not a large and disastrous or unsafe problem. If it was an unsafe or widespread problem then it would have been necessary to repair all of the low rib receiversor sracp them. Receivers were only repaired when the barrel was worn out and needed changing. Not all receivers were repaired at this time either as only less than 50,000 receivers were produced with low guide ribs. As production numbers increased this became less of a concern or problem as over three million rifles were produced by the end of WWII.

                      Paul 'Bubba'
                      Last edited by Bubba1; 04-05-2022, 11:59 PM.

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