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    Help determining the correct bolt

    I'm trying to carefully/slowly wade into the arena of correcting Garands. Probably just one really nice correct one. I got, in my opinion, extremely lucky on my last CMP order when I asked for a legit WWII production rifle and they sent me serial number 59,107. Most of my Garands I work on for fun and shoot when I can, because, well, that's what they were made for. But this one speaks to me differently. Anyway, BMS from this site has been helping me out immensely (thank you), but I don't want to burden him with all my questions, so I thought I'd throw it out here. As near as I can tell from reading everything I can find, that receiver was built in August of 1940. I'm thinking a D28287-2SA from heat lot B2, C11 or T1 would be about right, but not sure how to figure it out for sure. If anyone has any input on this or any other interesting/important parts or facts for this rifle I would love to hear them. Thanks for reading.
    Last edited by Bruw; 05-06-2019, 02:04 PM.

    #2
    I have two data sheets from original rifles: s/n 59708 shows revision 2 bolt heat lot C11 and s/n 56745 shows revision 2 bolt heat C11 also

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      #3
      You are undertaking a long and very expensive project if you plan on correcting that rifle. Good luck on your build

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        #4
        Originally posted by Orlando View Post
        You are undertaking a long and very expensive project if you plan on correcting that rifle. Good luck on your build
        I'm not sure that I plan to finish it Orlando. The barrel and stock may well be more elusive and/or expensive than I care to tackle. But I'm going to go ahead and work on the easier parts, just to get it a little closer. The rifle deserves to have a few really nice authentic parts on it.

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          #5
          Honestly the bolt is the only cheap part to replace. It makes no sense to change it if the rest of the rifle is complete mixmaster. You need a rifle with atleat original barrel to restore. Find a late WWII rifle with original barrel , parts are easier and cheaper to find.

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            #6
            Alot of the books out there are a good guide, ie. Canfield, Duff, etc.... but original datasheets are the best source. RCS posted two examples. Original rifles have been featured in the GCA journal and The Garand Times.

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              #7
              Paul, Really nice photos of your s/n 11267 gas trap rifle in the GCA Journal Winter 2018 issue. I have two very old data sheets on 11267, one from M1 Garand Research, Texas City TX and the other from Robert Seijas.

              I once bought a revision 2 bolt heat lot X1 from Matt Wright in CA, came from a SA 62K rifle with SA 8-40 barrel which he was parting out, never could find any reference to the X1 bolt in all the data sheets

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                #8
                Robert, I discovered the handguard liner is numbered without a revision on 11267 but couldn't get a good picture for the article. The short pinion is also interesting as it is numbered and then it had a grooved pressed around the drum. Not sure why. Interesting anomaly but I've seen a few original gas traps around this serial that had that groove. This one you can see the drawing number in the bottom of the groove . Very interesting.

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                  #9
                  There are a lot of early ww2 barrels on eBay. Some guy has about 20 for sale. I know I have seen early 40-41 barrels on there. What bores are like? Who knows? But it will be correct. And the barrels are cheap

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