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Culling brass.

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    Culling brass.

    This morning I have been working on a few 200 rnd trays of RA 68 brass that has been reloaded at least 8-10 times and annealed 3 or 4. De-priming with Frankford had tool. These are the steps that I use personally.

    1. Check for split necks.
    2. Examine base for extractor grove damage and make sure a berdan case hasn't worked it's way into the batch.
    3. De-prime. Looking for a good snap on the tool indicating good primer pocket. If it's weak it gets tossed into the trash.

    Whatta Hobby!

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Culling 1.jpg Views:	1 Size:	111.6 KB ID:	32373 Click image for larger version  Name:	Culling 2.jpg Views:	1 Size:	103.2 KB ID:	32374 Click image for larger version  Name:	Culling 3.jpg Views:	1 Size:	192.5 KB ID:	32375
    Last edited by NF1E; 12-29-2021, 06:47 AM.

    #2
    Never thought of the hand de-priming tool. Might consider getting one.
    The thief may possess something he stole, but he does not own it.
    The owner has a right to take his property back from the thief.

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      #3
      Originally posted by Smokey View Post
      Never thought of the hand de-priming tool. Might consider getting one.
      Best way there is to be " at one" with your brass. I also use a hand priming tool.

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        #4
        Same here. I went to annealing to save as much brass as possible. Still have spit necks but as I’m a plinker, I don’t pay attention to the number of reloads a cartridge has been through. I just enjoy the reloading process. I really enjoy it when a scoped rifle guy shows up on the range and tries to hit his clay pigeons on the berm and claims his scope is off. Then I take my M1A or Garand and turn them to powder. I have enough supplies to out live my life and somehow have a warm fuzzy feeling I screwing the manufacturer’s high prices. Like you said “what a hobby”.

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          #5
          Originally posted by Beltfed View Post
          Same here. I went to annealing to save as much brass as possible. Still have spit necks but as I’m a plinker, I don’t pay attention to the number of reloads a cartridge has been through. I just enjoy the reloading process. I really enjoy it when a scoped rifle guy shows up on the range and tries to hit his clay pigeons on the berm and claims his scope is off. Then I take my M1A or Garand and turn them to powder. I have enough supplies to out live my life and somehow have a warm fuzzy feeling I screwing the manufacturer’s high prices. Like you said “what a hobby”.
          Rgr that. I have a couple of lifetimes worth of components on hand and a Son that will be more than happy to get them when my number is called.

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            #6
            I have no sons to pass it to, but a gun nut nephew. He says he will attend my funeral service, but when everyone turns left for the graveside he is turning right and heading toward my reloading room.

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              #7
              Originally posted by Beltfed View Post
              I have no sons to pass it to, but a gun nut nephew. He says he will attend my funeral service, but when everyone turns left for the graveside he is turning right and heading toward my reloading room.
              I is heartening to have at least one honest person in the family.

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                #8
                you might want to consider annealing before sizing unless you have plenty of brass.

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